open access

Vol 93, No 5 (2022)
Review paper
Published online: 2022-02-04
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Gluten-free diet — remedy for infertility or dangerous trend?

Angelika Krawczyk1, Anna Kretek1, Dagmara Pluta2, Karolina Kowalczyk2, Iwona Czech2, Patrycja Radosz2, Pawel Madej2
·
Pubmed: 35156701
·
Ginekol Pol 2022;93(5):422-426.
Affiliations
  1. Students Scientific Association of Gynecological Endocrinology, School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland;
  2. Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, School of Medicine in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

open access

Vol 93, No 5 (2022)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2022-02-04

Abstract

Association between celiac disease (CD) and infertility has been a point of consideration for many years. There are lots of studies which present contradictory results. It is accepted that women with unexplained infertility have three times higher risk of CD compared to the healthy women. This finding leads to the conclusion that a gluten-free diet (GFD), as the only effective method of treatment CD, is important to improve fertility. It is observed that women diagnosed with CD and treated by GFD, have positive pregnancy outcomes including better effects of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Excluding gluten from diet by women without CD diagnosis could bring adverse outcomes, because the risk of malnutrition if diet is unbalanced.

On the other hand, some research show that not only GFD but CD is related to malnutrition which could be the cause of problems with getting pregnant or with termination of pregnancy. Regarding CD influence on women's reproductive system, it is not only connected with unexplained infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes, but also with delayed menarche, early menopause and decrease of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH). What is more, non-celiac wheat sensitivity affects the reproductive system by increasing risk of menstrual disorders too.

The main aim of this paper is presenting scientific facts about the link between gluten elimination and fertility. It is very important to provide patients with reliable fact-checked information in the context of their symptoms.

Abstract

Association between celiac disease (CD) and infertility has been a point of consideration for many years. There are lots of studies which present contradictory results. It is accepted that women with unexplained infertility have three times higher risk of CD compared to the healthy women. This finding leads to the conclusion that a gluten-free diet (GFD), as the only effective method of treatment CD, is important to improve fertility. It is observed that women diagnosed with CD and treated by GFD, have positive pregnancy outcomes including better effects of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Excluding gluten from diet by women without CD diagnosis could bring adverse outcomes, because the risk of malnutrition if diet is unbalanced.

On the other hand, some research show that not only GFD but CD is related to malnutrition which could be the cause of problems with getting pregnant or with termination of pregnancy. Regarding CD influence on women's reproductive system, it is not only connected with unexplained infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes, but also with delayed menarche, early menopause and decrease of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH). What is more, non-celiac wheat sensitivity affects the reproductive system by increasing risk of menstrual disorders too.

The main aim of this paper is presenting scientific facts about the link between gluten elimination and fertility. It is very important to provide patients with reliable fact-checked information in the context of their symptoms.

Get Citation

Keywords

celiac disease; infertility; reproductive disorders; gluten-free diet; adverse pregnancy outcomes

About this article
Title

Gluten-free diet — remedy for infertility or dangerous trend?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 93, No 5 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

422-426

Published online

2022-02-04

Page views

6025

Article views/downloads

2203

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0223

Pubmed

35156701

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2022;93(5):422-426.

Keywords

celiac disease
infertility
reproductive disorders
gluten-free diet
adverse pregnancy outcomes

Authors

Angelika Krawczyk
Anna Kretek
Dagmara Pluta
Karolina Kowalczyk
Iwona Czech
Patrycja Radosz
Pawel Madej

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