open access

Vol 93, No 10 (2022)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-12-14
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P1 promoter IGF-1 polymorphism and IGF-1, IGF-R, LSF, and TSG 101 expression profile in endometriosis

Wojciech Kwasniewski1, Aleksandra Stupak2, Maria Wolun-Cholewa3, Agnieszka Fronczek4, Anna Kwasniewska2, Jan Kotarski1, Grzegorz Polak1, Anna Gozdzicka-Jozefiak5
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0210
·
Pubmed: 35072229
·
Ginekol Pol 2022;93(10):775-786.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Gynecological Oncology and Gynecology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Pathology of Pregnancy, Medical University of Lublin, Poland
  3. Department of Cell Biology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  4. Department of Patomorphology, Independent Clinical Hospital No. 1, Lublin, Poland
  5. Department of Molecular Virology, Molecular Biology Techniques Laboratory, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

open access

Vol 93, No 10 (2022)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-12-14

Abstract

Objectives: The presence of the endometrium outside the uterine cavity affects about 10% of women of childbearing age. Studies of the progression of endometriosis to cancer have been supported by numerous evidences of gene expression or gene defect caused by oxidative stress and inflammation. We decided to check the expression of selected factors responsible for the proliferation, as in the stages of neoplasia.
Material and methods: A group of 80 women with ovary localization of endometriosis was qualified for research.
The control group was 90 patients with ovarian simplex or follicular cysts. The DNA isolation, immunohistochemical analysis of IGF 1, IGF–R, TSG 101, and LSF expressions with a quantitative scoring of slides and electron microscopy was performed.
Results: The IGF-1-immunopositive cells in the reference group were in statistically significantly higher number compared to the cells forming the foci of endometriosis (p = 0.0282). However, the number of IGF-R-immunopositive cells was comparable to the endometriosis (p = 0.1264). In the control group, the number of LSF-immunopositive cells was statistically significantly higher in comparison to endometriosis foci (p = 0.000001), but the number of TSG 101-immunositive cells was comparable to endometriosis foci (p = 0.3834). A weak negative correlation between the number of cells expressing the TSG 101 factor and the IGF-1 receptor was found in the endometriosis group (r = –0.26, p = 0.0196). The analysis of CA single nucleotide polymorphism in the DNA isolated from both groups showed a comparable incidence of MSS and MSI-L genotypes (chi2 p = 0,9160).
Conclusions: How these factors affect the development of endometriosis and whether they could be helpful in the diagnosis requires further research.

Abstract

Objectives: The presence of the endometrium outside the uterine cavity affects about 10% of women of childbearing age. Studies of the progression of endometriosis to cancer have been supported by numerous evidences of gene expression or gene defect caused by oxidative stress and inflammation. We decided to check the expression of selected factors responsible for the proliferation, as in the stages of neoplasia.
Material and methods: A group of 80 women with ovary localization of endometriosis was qualified for research.
The control group was 90 patients with ovarian simplex or follicular cysts. The DNA isolation, immunohistochemical analysis of IGF 1, IGF–R, TSG 101, and LSF expressions with a quantitative scoring of slides and electron microscopy was performed.
Results: The IGF-1-immunopositive cells in the reference group were in statistically significantly higher number compared to the cells forming the foci of endometriosis (p = 0.0282). However, the number of IGF-R-immunopositive cells was comparable to the endometriosis (p = 0.1264). In the control group, the number of LSF-immunopositive cells was statistically significantly higher in comparison to endometriosis foci (p = 0.000001), but the number of TSG 101-immunositive cells was comparable to endometriosis foci (p = 0.3834). A weak negative correlation between the number of cells expressing the TSG 101 factor and the IGF-1 receptor was found in the endometriosis group (r = –0.26, p = 0.0196). The analysis of CA single nucleotide polymorphism in the DNA isolated from both groups showed a comparable incidence of MSS and MSI-L genotypes (chi2 p = 0,9160).
Conclusions: How these factors affect the development of endometriosis and whether they could be helpful in the diagnosis requires further research.

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Keywords

endometriosis; molecular biology; IGF-I CA (19)n P1IGF-I repeats; IGF-; LSF; TSG 100

About this article
Title

P1 promoter IGF-1 polymorphism and IGF-1, IGF-R, LSF, and TSG 101 expression profile in endometriosis

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 93, No 10 (2022)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

775-786

Published online

2021-12-14

Page views

688

Article views/downloads

352

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0210

Pubmed

35072229

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2022;93(10):775-786.

Keywords

endometriosis
molecular biology
IGF-I CA (19)n P1IGF-I repeats
IGF-
LSF
TSG 100

Authors

Wojciech Kwasniewski
Aleksandra Stupak
Maria Wolun-Cholewa
Agnieszka Fronczek
Anna Kwasniewska
Jan Kotarski
Grzegorz Polak
Anna Gozdzicka-Jozefiak

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