open access

Vol 93, No 4 (2022)
Review paper
Early publication date: 2022-03-28
Get Citation

Correlation between human papillomavirus infection and reproduction

Li-li Duan1, Hong Yin1, Qiuyan Li1, Lingjian Zhou1, Xinru Mi1, Yanmei Ju1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0175
·
Pubmed: 35419800
·
Ginekol Pol 2022;93(4):329-333.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics, The Eighth People's Hospital Hebei Province, Gucheng County, Hengshui City, Hebei Province, China

open access

Vol 93, No 4 (2022)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Early publication date: 2022-03-28

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infectious viruses among men and women of reproductive age throughout the world. Pregnant women are susceptible during pregnancy and most infections of them are self-limiting infections, which can be removed by their autoimmunity, while the persistent infections are associated with precancerous lesions and cancer of the anogenital mucosa in women and men. In addition, HPV infection may also affect reproductive health and fertility. The effect of HPV on female fertility requires further study, but HPV influences sperm parameters. Furthermore, whether HPV infection alters the effect of assisted reproductive technology and whether there is an association between it and assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes is unknown. It is considered that the relationship between HPV infection and spontaneous abortion (SA), assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes and spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) has profound implications for the medical care of pregnant and infertile women. This paper reviews the relationship between human papillomavirus infection during pregnancy and SA, sPTB and ART in reproduction, and reviews the relationship between human papillomavirus and human fertility by summarizing the recent domestic and foreign literature.

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infectious viruses among men and women of reproductive age throughout the world. Pregnant women are susceptible during pregnancy and most infections of them are self-limiting infections, which can be removed by their autoimmunity, while the persistent infections are associated with precancerous lesions and cancer of the anogenital mucosa in women and men. In addition, HPV infection may also affect reproductive health and fertility. The effect of HPV on female fertility requires further study, but HPV influences sperm parameters. Furthermore, whether HPV infection alters the effect of assisted reproductive technology and whether there is an association between it and assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes is unknown. It is considered that the relationship between HPV infection and spontaneous abortion (SA), assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes and spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) has profound implications for the medical care of pregnant and infertile women. This paper reviews the relationship between human papillomavirus infection during pregnancy and SA, sPTB and ART in reproduction, and reviews the relationship between human papillomavirus and human fertility by summarizing the recent domestic and foreign literature.

Get Citation

Keywords

human papillomavirus infection; reproduction; spontaneous abortion; assisted reproductive technology; spontaneous preterm birth

About this article
Title

Correlation between human papillomavirus infection and reproduction

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 93, No 4 (2022)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

329-333

Early publication date

2022-03-28

Page views

227

Article views/downloads

92

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0175

Pubmed

35419800

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2022;93(4):329-333.

Keywords

human papillomavirus infection
reproduction
spontaneous abortion
assisted reproductive technology
spontaneous preterm birth

Authors

Li-li Duan
Hong Yin
Qiuyan Li
Lingjian Zhou
Xinru Mi
Yanmei Ju

References (55)
  1. Bosch FX, Broker TR, Forman D, et al. authors of ICO Monograph Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012, authors of the ICO Monograph ‘Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases’ Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012, Authors of the ICO Monograph ‘Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases’ Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases. Vaccine. 2013; 31 Suppl 8: I1–31.
  2. Ault KA. Epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus infections in the female genital tract. Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2006; 2006 Suppl: 40470.
  3. de Sanjosé S, Diaz M, Castellsagué X, et al. Worldwide prevalence and genotype distribution of cervical human papillomavirus DNA in women with normal cytology: a meta-analysis. Lancet Infect Dis. 2007; 7(7): 453–459.
  4. Liu G, Markowitz LE, Hariri S, et al. Seroprevalence of 9 Human Papillomavirus Types in the United States, 2005-2006. J Infect Dis. 2016; 213(2): 191–198.
  5. Wang HY, Hong Y, Hu Y, et al. et al.. A multicenter study on cervical cancer screening and nmternal-fetal transmission of human papillomavirus in pregnant women. Jiangsu Medical Journal. 2015; 24: 2958–2960.
  6. zur Hausen H. Papillomaviruses in the causation of human cancers - a brief historical account. Virology. 2009; 384(2): 260–265.
  7. Schiffman M, Clifford G, Buonaguro FM. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline. Infect Agent Cancer. 2009; 4: 8.
  8. Bober L, Guzowski G, Moczulska H, et al. Influence of human Papilloma Virus (hPV) infection on early pregnancy. Ginekol Pol. 2019; 90(2): 72–75.
  9. Rahimkhani M, Mordadi A, Gilanpour M. Detection of urinary Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and human papilloma virus in the first trimester of pregnancy by PCR method. Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob. 2018; 17(1): 25.
  10. Xiong YQ, Mo Y, Luo QM, et al. The Risk of Human Papillomavirus Infection for Spontaneous Abortion, Spontaneous Preterm Birth, and Pregnancy Rate of Assisted Reproductive Technologies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2018; 83(5): 417–427.
  11. Wang BJ, Gong Z, Hu ZX, et al. Human Papillomavirus and Pregnancy Related Problems. Journal of International Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2020; 3: 258–261.
  12. Ault KA. Epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus infections in the female genital tract. Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2006; 2006 Suppl: 40470.
  13. Baseman JG, Koutsky LA. The epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections. J Clin Virol. 2005; 32 Suppl 1: S16–S24.
  14. zur Hausen H. Papillomaviruses in the causation of human cancers - a brief historical account. Virology. 2009; 384(2): 260–265.
  15. Paavonen J, Eggert-Kruse W. Chlamydia trachomatis: impact on human reproduction. Hum Reprod Update. 1999; 5(5): 433–447.
  16. Gray-Swain MR, Peipert JF. Pelvic inflammatory disease in adolescents. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2006; 18(5): 503–510.
  17. Cohain JS, Buxbaum RE, Mankuta D. Spontaneous first trimester miscarriage rates per woman among parous women with 1 or more pregnancies of 24 weeks or more. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017; 17(1): 437.
  18. Hellberg D, Nilsson S. IVF and HPV. Fertil Steril. 2007; 87(6): 1498; author reply 1498.
  19. Ambühl LM, Baandrup U, Dybkær K, et al. Human Papillomavirus Infection as a Possible Cause of Spontaneous Abortion and Spontaneous Preterm Delivery. Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 2016: 3086036.
  20. Xiong YQ, Mo Y, Luo QM, et al. The Risk of Human Papillomavirus Infection for Spontaneous Abortion, Spontaneous Preterm Birth, and Pregnancy Rate of Assisted Reproductive Technologies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2018; 83(5): 417–427.
  21. Srinivas SK, Ma Y, Sammel MD, et al. Placental inflammation and viral infection are implicated in second trimester pregnancy loss. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2006; 195(3): 797–802.
  22. Racicot K, Mor G, Silasi M, et al. Viral infections during pregnancy. Am J Reprod Immunol. 2015; 73(3): 199–213.
  23. Tognon M, Tagliapietra A, Magagnoli F, et al. Investigation on Spontaneous Abortion and Human Papillomavirus Infection. Vaccines (Basel). 2020; 8(3).
  24. Sarkola ME, Grénman SE, Rintala MAM, et al. Human papillomavirus in the placenta and umbilical cord blood. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008; 87(11): 1181–1188.
  25. Matovina M, Husnjak K, Milutin N, et al. Possible role of bacterial and viral infections in miscarriages. Fertil Steril. 2004; 81(3): 662–669.
  26. You H, Liu Y, Agrawal N, et al. Multiple human papillomavirus types replicate in 3A trophoblasts. Placenta. 2008; 29(1): 30–38.
  27. Ambühl LMM, Villadsen AB, Baandrup U, et al. HPV16 E6 and E7 Upregulate Interferon-Induced Antiviral Response Genes ISG15 and IFIT1 in Human Trophoblast Cells. Pathogens. 2017; 6(3).
  28. Ruffin MT, Bailey JM, Roulston D, et al. Human papillomavirus in amniotic fluid. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2006; 6: 28.
  29. Chisanga C, Eggert D, Mitchell CD, et al. Evidence for Placental HPV Infection in Both HIV Positive and Negative Women. J Cancer Ther. 2015; 6(15): 1276–1289.
  30. Worda C, Huber A, Hudelist G, et al. Prevalence of cervical and intrauterine human papillomavirus infection in the third trimester in asymptomatic women. J Soc Gynecol Investig. 2005; 12(6): 440–444.
  31. Perino A, Giovannelli L, Schillaci R, et al. Human papillomavirus infection in couples undergoing in vitro fertilization procedures: impact on reproductive outcomes. Fertil Steril. 2011; 95(5): 1845–1848.
  32. Bober L, Guzowski G, Moczulska H, et al. Influence of human Papilloma Virus (hPV) infection on early pregnancy. Ginekol Pol. 2019; 90(2): 72–75.
  33. Ticconi C, Pietropolli A, Fabbri G, et al. Recurrent miscarriage and cervical human papillomavirus infection. Am J Reprod Immunol. 2013; 70(5): 343–346.
  34. Skoczyński M, Goździcka-Józefiak A, Kwaśniewska A. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in spontaneously aborted products of conception. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2011; 90(12): 1402–1405.
  35. Mosbah A, Barakat R, Nabiel Y, et al. High-risk and low-risk human papilloma virus in association to spontaneous preterm labor: a case-control study in a tertiary center, Egypt. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2018; 31(6): 720–725.
  36. Jaworek H, Zborilova B, Koudelakova V, et al. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in oocyte donors and women treated for infertility: An observational laboratory-based study. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol X. 2019; 4: 100068.
  37. Eppel W, Worda C, Frigo P, et al. Human papillomavirus in the cervix and placenta. Obstet Gynecol. 2000; 96(3): 337–341.
  38. Foresta C, Garolla A, Zuccarello D, et al. Human papillomavirus found in sperm head of young adult males affects the progressive motility. Fertil Steril. 2010; 93(3): 802–806.
  39. Cao X, Wei R, Zhang X, et al. Impact of human papillomavirus infection in semen on sperm progressive motility in infertile men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2020; 18(1): 38.
  40. Perino A, Giovannelli L, Schillaci R, et al. Human papillomavirus infection in couples undergoing in vitro fertilization procedures: impact on reproductive outcomes. Fertil Steril. 2011; 95(5): 1845–1848.
  41. Hermonat PL, Han L, Wendel PJ, et al. Human papillomavirus is more prevalent in first trimester spontaneously aborted products of conception compared to elective specimens. Virus Genes. 1997; 14(1): 13–17.
  42. Garolla A, De Toni L, Bottacin A, et al. Human Papillomavirus Prophylactic Vaccination improves reproductive outcome in infertile patients with HPV semen infection: a retrospective study. Sci Rep. 2018; 8(1): 912.
  43. Garolla A, Lenzi A, Palù G, et al. Human papillomavirus sperm infection and assisted reproduction: a dangerous hazard with a possible safe solution. Hum Reprod. 2012; 27(4): 967–973.
  44. Fenizia C, Vittori C, Oneta M, et al. Human papillomavirus in spermatozoa is efficiently removed by washing: a suitable approach for assisted reproduction. Reprod Biomed Online. 2020; 40(5): 693–699.
  45. Zacharis K, Messini CI, Anifandis G, et al. Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and Fertilization: A Mini Review. Medicina (Kaunas). 2018; 54(4).
  46. Foresta C, Patassini C, Bertoldo A, et al. Mechanism of human papillomavirus binding to human spermatozoa and fertilizing ability of infected spermatozoa. PLoS One. 2011; 6(3): e15036.
  47. Medley N, Vogel JP, Care A, et al. Interventions during pregnancy to prevent preterm birth: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2018; 11: CD012505.
  48. Jiang NN, Zhong LJ. Analysis of high risk factors of very early preterm birth and early preterm birth in pregnant women. Maternal and Child Health Care of China. 2021; 36(04): 792–795.
  49. Koi H, Zhang J, Parry S. The mechanisms of placental viral infection. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2001; 943: 148–156.
  50. Arechavaleta-Velasco F, Koi H, Strauss J, et al. Viral infection of the trophoblast: time to take a serious look at its role in abnormal implantation and placentation? Journal of Reproductive Immunology. 2002; 55(1-2): 113–121.
  51. Andrews WW, Goldenberg RL, Hauth JC. Preterm labor: emerging role of genital tract infections. Infect Agents Dis. 1995; 4(4): 196–211.
  52. Zuo Z, Goel S, Carter JE. Association of cervical cytology and HPV DNA status during pregnancy with placental abnormalities and preterm birth. Am J Clin Pathol. 2011; 136(2): 260–265.
  53. Cho G, Min KJ, Hong HR, et al. High-risk human papillomavirus infection is associated with premature rupture of membranes. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013; 13: 173.
  54. Gomez LM, Ma Y, Ho C, et al. Placental infection with human papillomavirus is associated with spontaneous preterm delivery. Hum Reprod. 2008; 23(3): 709–715.
  55. Zuo Z, Goel S, Carter JE. Association of cervical cytology and HPV DNA status during pregnancy with placental abnormalities and preterm birth. Am J Clin Pathol. 2011; 136(2): 260–265.

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl