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Research paper
Published online: 2021-10-06
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Human papillomavirus genotyping in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

Marcin Przybylski12, Sonja Millert-Kalinska1, Andrzej Zmaczynski3, Rafal Baran3, Lucja Zaborowska3, Robert Jach3, Dominik Pruski14
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0167
Affiliations
  1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, District Public Hospital in Poznan, Poland
  2. Marcin Przybylski M.D. Gynecology Specialised Medical Practice Poznan, Poland
  3. Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Cracow, Poland
  4. Dominik Pruski M.D. Gynecology Specialised Medical Practice Poznan, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-10-06

Abstract

Objectives: Human papillomavirus infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. Long-term exposure to the HPV leads to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions affecting cervical cancer. Knowledge about the distribution of HPV genotypes is crucial to guide the introduction of prophylactic vaccines. We aimed the genotype distribution in patients reporting due to abnormal Pap — smear tests. Material and methods: We provide a prospective observational cohort study. We obtained material from 428 women registered to Provincial Hospital in Poznan and Specialist Medical Practice in 2018–2020. In the current study, we analyze results from the first 110 inclusions with the diagnosis of HSIL from a cervical biopsy. The probe for the molecular test was collected with a combi brush and passed to an independent, standardized laboratory. HPV detection was done using PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping with a reverse hybridization line probe assay. Sequence analysis was performed to characterize HPV-positive samples with unknown HPV genotypes. The molecular test detected DNA of 41 HPV genotypes. We performed statistical analyzes using the STATISTICA package 13.3. Results: We found that 98.2% of patients received HPV-positive test results. The most frequent HPV genotype was 16, which assumed for 54.1%. In patients negative for HPV 16, the percentage decreased with increasing age. We detected that the following HPV types are next most common: HPV 31 (16.2 %), HPV 52 (11.7%), HPV 51 (9.9%), HPV 18 (9.0%), HPV 33 (9%). Moreover, thyroid diseases were the most common comorbidities and occurred in 15 patients Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the most extensive assessment of HPV genotypes in HSIL diagnoses in Poland.

Abstract

Objectives: Human papillomavirus infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. Long-term exposure to the HPV leads to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions affecting cervical cancer. Knowledge about the distribution of HPV genotypes is crucial to guide the introduction of prophylactic vaccines. We aimed the genotype distribution in patients reporting due to abnormal Pap — smear tests. Material and methods: We provide a prospective observational cohort study. We obtained material from 428 women registered to Provincial Hospital in Poznan and Specialist Medical Practice in 2018–2020. In the current study, we analyze results from the first 110 inclusions with the diagnosis of HSIL from a cervical biopsy. The probe for the molecular test was collected with a combi brush and passed to an independent, standardized laboratory. HPV detection was done using PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping with a reverse hybridization line probe assay. Sequence analysis was performed to characterize HPV-positive samples with unknown HPV genotypes. The molecular test detected DNA of 41 HPV genotypes. We performed statistical analyzes using the STATISTICA package 13.3. Results: We found that 98.2% of patients received HPV-positive test results. The most frequent HPV genotype was 16, which assumed for 54.1%. In patients negative for HPV 16, the percentage decreased with increasing age. We detected that the following HPV types are next most common: HPV 31 (16.2 %), HPV 52 (11.7%), HPV 51 (9.9%), HPV 18 (9.0%), HPV 33 (9%). Moreover, thyroid diseases were the most common comorbidities and occurred in 15 patients Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the most extensive assessment of HPV genotypes in HSIL diagnoses in Poland.

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Keywords

HPV genotyping; HSIL; high-grade lesion; cervix biopsy

About this article
Title

Human papillomavirus genotyping in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-10-06

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0167

Keywords

HPV genotyping
HSIL
high-grade lesion
cervix biopsy

Authors

Marcin Przybylski
Sonja Millert-Kalinska
Andrzej Zmaczynski
Rafal Baran
Lucja Zaborowska
Robert Jach
Dominik Pruski

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