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Published online: 2021-07-15
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COVID-19 infection in pregnancy: a single center experience with 75 cases

Tuba Damar Çakırca, Ayşe Torun, Melek Hamidanoğlu, Reyhan Derya Portakal, Merhamet Ölçen, Gökhan Çakırca, Murat Haksever
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0118
·
Pubmed: 34263921

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-07-15

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to summarize the clinical features, maternal, fetal, and perinatal outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) proven infections of pregnancies.

Material and methods: This retrospective single center study was conducted on 75 pregnant patients diagnosed of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Demographic characteristics, clinical courses, laboratory and radiological findings, and maternal and perinatal outcomes were analyzed using medical records.

Results: Of the 75 pregnant women infected with COVID-19, 49 had mild infections. The most common initial symptoms were myalgia (61.4%), cough (57.9%), headache (50.9%), and dyspnea (49.1%). More than half of the patients (57.3%) on admission were in their third trimester. Three patients had pre-existing chronic illnesses (hypothyroidism, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis) and three patients had gestational diabetes. There were two cases admitted to intensive care unit, one of whom was due to COVID-19 infection. No maternal mortality was recorded. The mode of delivery was a cesarean section in 20 cases among the 35 labors. Six gestations ended in a miscarriage and 11 women gave birth prematurely. One stillbirth occurred at the 38th week of gestation. Among 37 neonates, 14 necessitated admission to neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal mortality, congenital malformation, and mother to child transmission were not seen in the newborns.

Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that the clinical course of COVID-19 infection in pregnant women was mostly asymptomatic/mild. There was also no evidence of vertical transmission of COVID-19 infection.

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to summarize the clinical features, maternal, fetal, and perinatal outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) proven infections of pregnancies.

Material and methods: This retrospective single center study was conducted on 75 pregnant patients diagnosed of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Demographic characteristics, clinical courses, laboratory and radiological findings, and maternal and perinatal outcomes were analyzed using medical records.

Results: Of the 75 pregnant women infected with COVID-19, 49 had mild infections. The most common initial symptoms were myalgia (61.4%), cough (57.9%), headache (50.9%), and dyspnea (49.1%). More than half of the patients (57.3%) on admission were in their third trimester. Three patients had pre-existing chronic illnesses (hypothyroidism, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis) and three patients had gestational diabetes. There were two cases admitted to intensive care unit, one of whom was due to COVID-19 infection. No maternal mortality was recorded. The mode of delivery was a cesarean section in 20 cases among the 35 labors. Six gestations ended in a miscarriage and 11 women gave birth prematurely. One stillbirth occurred at the 38th week of gestation. Among 37 neonates, 14 necessitated admission to neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal mortality, congenital malformation, and mother to child transmission were not seen in the newborns.

Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that the clinical course of COVID-19 infection in pregnant women was mostly asymptomatic/mild. There was also no evidence of vertical transmission of COVID-19 infection.

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Keywords

COVID-19; pregnancy; perinatal outcome; SARS-CoV-2; vertical transmission

About this article
Title

COVID-19 infection in pregnancy: a single center experience with 75 cases

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-07-15

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0118

Pubmed

34263921

Keywords

COVID-19
pregnancy
perinatal outcome
SARS-CoV-2
vertical transmission

Authors

Tuba Damar Çakırca
Ayşe Torun
Melek Hamidanoğlu
Reyhan Derya Portakal
Merhamet Ölçen
Gökhan Çakırca
Murat Haksever

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