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Research paper
Published online: 2021-08-25
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The effect of interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention on FPG, 2hPG, SDS, SAS scores and the pregnancy outcomes of gestational diabetes mellitus

Guo-Hong Zhu1, Yun Xu1, Li Zou1, Qing Zhou1, Li-Juan Zhou1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0066
·
Pubmed: 34541650


Affiliations

  1. Taizhou People's Hospital, Taihu Road, Medical High-tech Zone, Taizhou, China, China

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2021-08-25

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to explore the effect of interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention on FPG, 2hPG, SDS, SAS scores and pregnancy outcome of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

Material and methods: A total of 180 GDM patients, who were admitted to our hospital between June 2019 and June 2020, were enrolled as the research subjects and randomly divided into two groups: a research group and a control group (n = 90, each). The patients in the control group received routine care while the patients in the research group received interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention. The fasting blood-glucose (FPG), two-hour postprandial blood glucose (2hPBG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), SDS, SAS scores, and pregnancy outcome of the two groups of pregnant women were analyzed and compared.

Results: The differences in the levels of FBG, 2hPBG and HbA1C between the two groups before nursing were not statistically significant. After nursing, the levels of FBG, 2hPBG, and HbA1C of the two groups of patients decreased, and the differences in each group before and after intervention were statistically significant. These indexes were lower in the research group than in the control group, the differences being statistically significant. There were no significant differences between the two groups in SAS and SDS scores before nursing, but there were statistically significant differences after nursing. The incidence of unfavorable pregnancy outcome was lower in the research group (8.89%) than in the control group (14.44%), but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention can effectively reduce FPG, 2hPG, SDS, and SAS scores in GDM women.

Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to explore the effect of interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention on FPG, 2hPG, SDS, SAS scores and pregnancy outcome of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

Material and methods: A total of 180 GDM patients, who were admitted to our hospital between June 2019 and June 2020, were enrolled as the research subjects and randomly divided into two groups: a research group and a control group (n = 90, each). The patients in the control group received routine care while the patients in the research group received interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention. The fasting blood-glucose (FPG), two-hour postprandial blood glucose (2hPBG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), SDS, SAS scores, and pregnancy outcome of the two groups of pregnant women were analyzed and compared.

Results: The differences in the levels of FBG, 2hPBG and HbA1C between the two groups before nursing were not statistically significant. After nursing, the levels of FBG, 2hPBG, and HbA1C of the two groups of patients decreased, and the differences in each group before and after intervention were statistically significant. These indexes were lower in the research group than in the control group, the differences being statistically significant. There were no significant differences between the two groups in SAS and SDS scores before nursing, but there were statistically significant differences after nursing. The incidence of unfavorable pregnancy outcome was lower in the research group (8.89%) than in the control group (14.44%), but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05).

Conclusions: Interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention can effectively reduce FPG, 2hPG, SDS, and SAS scores in GDM women.

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Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus; health education; nutrition intervention; SDS and SAS scores; pregnancy outcome

About this article
Title

The effect of interdisciplinary and diversified health education combined with personalized nutrition intervention on FPG, 2hPG, SDS, SAS scores and the pregnancy outcomes of gestational diabetes mellitus

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-08-25

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0066

Pubmed

34541650

Keywords

gestational diabetes mellitus
health education
nutrition intervention
SDS and SAS scores
pregnancy outcome

Authors

Guo-Hong Zhu
Yun Xu
Li Zou
Qing Zhou
Li-Juan Zhou

References (14)
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