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Research paper
Published online: 2021-03-09
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Depression, anxiety and self-esteem in adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome

Agnieszka Zachurzok, Agnieszka Pasztak-Opilka, Aneta Monika Gawlik
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2021.0042

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2021-03-09

Abstract

Objectives: Objective of the study was to evaluate the depression, anxiety and perceived stress level in adolescent girls
with diagnosed polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), as well as to assess their body and self-esteem and its impact on
emotional status.
Material and methods: In 27 adolescent girls with confirmed diagnosis of PCOS (study group) as well as 27 healthy, regularly
menstruating, age and BMI matched girls (control group) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Perceived Stress
Scale-10 (PSS-10), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and Body-Esteem Scale (BES) containing three subscales (sexual
attractiveness, weight concern, physical condition) were performed.
Results: There were no significant differences between PCOS group and control group in depression and PSS-10 scores,
but the anxiety score was significantly higher in control than in PCOS group (9.6 ± 3.0 vs 7.3 ± 3.9, p = 0.02). Moreover,
in BES subscales’ scores there were no significant differences between the groups, whereas RSES score was significantly
higher in PCOS group (25.0 ± 7.1 vs 28.3 ± 4.6, p = 0.04). In PCOS group anxiety score was related to PSS-10 score (r = 0.56,
p = 0.005). Moreover, we found that obesity was negatively related to anxiety (rƴ = –0.4, p = 0.04), depression (rƴ = –0.48,
p = 0.02), PSS-10 (rƴ = –0.59, p = 0.004) and physical condition scores (rƴ = –0.44, p = 0.04). In girls with PCOS the more severe
depression the worse weight control (rƴ = –0.56, p = 0.04).
Conclusions: We conclude that in adolescent girls PCOS is not related to anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as poor
self-esteem.

Abstract

Objectives: Objective of the study was to evaluate the depression, anxiety and perceived stress level in adolescent girls
with diagnosed polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), as well as to assess their body and self-esteem and its impact on
emotional status.
Material and methods: In 27 adolescent girls with confirmed diagnosis of PCOS (study group) as well as 27 healthy, regularly
menstruating, age and BMI matched girls (control group) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Perceived Stress
Scale-10 (PSS-10), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and Body-Esteem Scale (BES) containing three subscales (sexual
attractiveness, weight concern, physical condition) were performed.
Results: There were no significant differences between PCOS group and control group in depression and PSS-10 scores,
but the anxiety score was significantly higher in control than in PCOS group (9.6 ± 3.0 vs 7.3 ± 3.9, p = 0.02). Moreover,
in BES subscales’ scores there were no significant differences between the groups, whereas RSES score was significantly
higher in PCOS group (25.0 ± 7.1 vs 28.3 ± 4.6, p = 0.04). In PCOS group anxiety score was related to PSS-10 score (r = 0.56,
p = 0.005). Moreover, we found that obesity was negatively related to anxiety (rƴ = –0.4, p = 0.04), depression (rƴ = –0.48,
p = 0.02), PSS-10 (rƴ = –0.59, p = 0.004) and physical condition scores (rƴ = –0.44, p = 0.04). In girls with PCOS the more severe
depression the worse weight control (rƴ = –0.56, p = 0.04).
Conclusions: We conclude that in adolescent girls PCOS is not related to anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as poor
self-esteem.

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Keywords

adolescent girls; polycystic ovary syndrome; depression; anxiety; self-esteem

About this article
Title

Depression, anxiety and self-esteem in adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-03-09

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2021.0042

Keywords

adolescent girls
polycystic ovary syndrome
depression
anxiety
self-esteem

Authors

Agnieszka Zachurzok
Agnieszka Pasztak-Opilka
Aneta Monika Gawlik

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