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Guidelines / Expert consensus
Published online: 2020-12-09
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Recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postpartum depression

Monika Dominiak, Anna Z. Antosik-Wojcinska, Marta Baron, Pawel Mierzejewski, Lukasz Swiecicki
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2020.0141
·
Pubmed: 33448014

open access

Ahead of Print
RECOMMENDATIONS
Published online: 2020-12-09

Abstract

Epidemiological data clearly indicate that depression is becoming an increasingly important health and social problem
today. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression currently affects 350 million people worldwide and
is considered the second most common cause of disability in Europe after ischemic heart disease. It is estimated that this
health problem may affect as many as five million people in Poland. The gap between the reported number of patients
treated and the prevalence of depression, highlights the scale of unmet needs. With the limited availability of specialists
in psychiatric care, the most appropriate measures seem to be those aimed at increasing the competence of doctors of
other specialties in the diagnosis and treatment of depression. Early detection and treatment results in faster remission,
reduces relapses and mortality.
The recommendations concerning prevention of depression were commissioned by the Polish Ministry of Health as a part of
the Depression Prevention Program for 2016–2020. The Program has developed recommendations addressed to specialists
in various fields of medicine, other than psychiatry, focusing on three risk groups: children and adolescents, women in the
perinatal period and the elderly. These recommendations focus on the management of suspected postpartum depression
and provide specific guidelines for medical staff having contact with pregnant and postpartum women (gynecologists,
midwives, pediatricians).

Abstract

Epidemiological data clearly indicate that depression is becoming an increasingly important health and social problem
today. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression currently affects 350 million people worldwide and
is considered the second most common cause of disability in Europe after ischemic heart disease. It is estimated that this
health problem may affect as many as five million people in Poland. The gap between the reported number of patients
treated and the prevalence of depression, highlights the scale of unmet needs. With the limited availability of specialists
in psychiatric care, the most appropriate measures seem to be those aimed at increasing the competence of doctors of
other specialties in the diagnosis and treatment of depression. Early detection and treatment results in faster remission,
reduces relapses and mortality.
The recommendations concerning prevention of depression were commissioned by the Polish Ministry of Health as a part of
the Depression Prevention Program for 2016–2020. The Program has developed recommendations addressed to specialists
in various fields of medicine, other than psychiatry, focusing on three risk groups: children and adolescents, women in the
perinatal period and the elderly. These recommendations focus on the management of suspected postpartum depression
and provide specific guidelines for medical staff having contact with pregnant and postpartum women (gynecologists,
midwives, pediatricians).

Get Citation

Keywords

postpartum depression; postnatal depression; perinatal depression; prevention of depression; recommendation

About this article
Title

Recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postpartum depression

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Guidelines / Expert consensus

Published online

2020-12-09

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2020.0141

Pubmed

33448014

Keywords

postpartum depression
postnatal depression
perinatal depression
prevention of depression
recommendation

Authors

Monika Dominiak
Anna Z. Antosik-Wojcinska
Marta Baron
Pawel Mierzejewski
Lukasz Swiecicki

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