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ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2020-08-18
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The immune complex p53 protein/anti-p53 autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of ovarian serous carcinoma

Aleksandra Mielczarek-Palacz, Justyna Sikora, Zdzisława Kondera-Anasz, Marta Smycz-Kubańska, Aleksandra Englisz, Jarosław Strzelczyk, Jacek Kabut
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2020.0123

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2020-08-18

Abstract

Objectives: The tests conducted were intended to analyze the concentration of p53 protein and anti-p53 autoantibodies in serum of women with ovarian tumours. Material and methods: The study included patients with diagnosed ovarian cancer: Cystadenoma serosum or Cystadenocarcinoma papillare serosum at IIIc stage (including 10 women who had G1, 14 women who had G2 and 30 women who had G3 staging). Concentrations of parameters were measured by ELISA. Results: The analysis of the obtained results showed statistical significance between the concentration of p53 protein depending on the degree of differentiation of G1 and G3 (p < 0.001) and anti-p53 autoantibodies depending on the degree of differentiation of G1 and G2 (p < 0.05) as well as G2 and G3 (p < 0.01). In addition, the determined p53/anti-p53 autoantibodies ratio was only significant between G1 and G2 (p < 0.05), as was the assessment of the percentage of the tested parameters in the immune complex. Conclusions: Immune system disorders involving the p53 protein and anti-p53 autoantibodies may be one of the immune mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian serous cancer.

Abstract

Objectives: The tests conducted were intended to analyze the concentration of p53 protein and anti-p53 autoantibodies in serum of women with ovarian tumours. Material and methods: The study included patients with diagnosed ovarian cancer: Cystadenoma serosum or Cystadenocarcinoma papillare serosum at IIIc stage (including 10 women who had G1, 14 women who had G2 and 30 women who had G3 staging). Concentrations of parameters were measured by ELISA. Results: The analysis of the obtained results showed statistical significance between the concentration of p53 protein depending on the degree of differentiation of G1 and G3 (p < 0.001) and anti-p53 autoantibodies depending on the degree of differentiation of G1 and G2 (p < 0.05) as well as G2 and G3 (p < 0.01). In addition, the determined p53/anti-p53 autoantibodies ratio was only significant between G1 and G2 (p < 0.05), as was the assessment of the percentage of the tested parameters in the immune complex. Conclusions: Immune system disorders involving the p53 protein and anti-p53 autoantibodies may be one of the immune mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian serous cancer.

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Keywords

autoantibodies anti-p53/p53 protein; ovarian cancer

About this article
Title

The immune complex p53 protein/anti-p53 autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of ovarian serous carcinoma

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2020-08-18

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2020.0123

Keywords

autoantibodies anti-p53/p53 protein
ovarian cancer

Authors

Aleksandra Mielczarek-Palacz
Justyna Sikora
Zdzisława Kondera-Anasz
Marta Smycz-Kubańska
Aleksandra Englisz
Jarosław Strzelczyk
Jacek Kabut

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