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Published online: 2020-10-19
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Comparison of Anti-müllerian Hormone (AMH) and Hormonal Assays for Phenotypic Classification of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Ali Cenk Ozay, Ozlen Emekcı Ozay, Bulent Gulekli
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2020.0122

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2020-10-19

Abstract

Objectives: The aim is to compare the hormonal status and anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) levels of patients who have
different polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) phenotypes, polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) and healthy women.
Material and methods: A total of 350 PCOS women, 71 women with PCOM and 79 healthy women with normal ovarian
morphology (NOM) were observed. PCOS patients were divided into groups according to the phenotypes. Phenotype
A- characterized by anovulation, hyperandrogenism and PCOM; phenotype B- defined as anovulation, hyperandrogenism;
Phenotype C- identified as hyperandrogenism and PCOM; Phenotype D- outlined as anovulation and PCOM. AMH levels
were compared for each group.
Results: Among 350 PCOS patients the highest number belonged to phenotype A (n = 117, 33.4%). The rest were distrubuted
as follows: phenotype B (n = 89, 25.4%), phenotype C (n = 72, 20.6%), phenotype D (n = 72, 20.6%). Phenotype A
(9.17 ± 4.56) had the highest mean AMH levels in our study. Comparison of AMH levels showed a statistically significant
difference between phenotypes A and D. There was a statistically significant difference on comparison of AMH between
NOM, PCOM and all PCOS phenotypes.
Conclusions: Phenotype A is the most serious form of PCOS and these patients has all three features which are hyperandrogenism,
anovulation and ultrasound findings of polycystic ovary (PCO). AMH reflects the severity of PCOS and patients
with Phenotype A have higher AMH levels.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim is to compare the hormonal status and anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) levels of patients who have
different polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) phenotypes, polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM) and healthy women.
Material and methods: A total of 350 PCOS women, 71 women with PCOM and 79 healthy women with normal ovarian
morphology (NOM) were observed. PCOS patients were divided into groups according to the phenotypes. Phenotype
A- characterized by anovulation, hyperandrogenism and PCOM; phenotype B- defined as anovulation, hyperandrogenism;
Phenotype C- identified as hyperandrogenism and PCOM; Phenotype D- outlined as anovulation and PCOM. AMH levels
were compared for each group.
Results: Among 350 PCOS patients the highest number belonged to phenotype A (n = 117, 33.4%). The rest were distrubuted
as follows: phenotype B (n = 89, 25.4%), phenotype C (n = 72, 20.6%), phenotype D (n = 72, 20.6%). Phenotype A
(9.17 ± 4.56) had the highest mean AMH levels in our study. Comparison of AMH levels showed a statistically significant
difference between phenotypes A and D. There was a statistically significant difference on comparison of AMH between
NOM, PCOM and all PCOS phenotypes.
Conclusions: Phenotype A is the most serious form of PCOS and these patients has all three features which are hyperandrogenism,
anovulation and ultrasound findings of polycystic ovary (PCO). AMH reflects the severity of PCOS and patients
with Phenotype A have higher AMH levels.

Get Citation

Keywords

polycystic ovary syndrome; phenotype; polycystic ovarian morphology; anti müllerian hormone; hyperandrogenism

About this article
Title

Comparison of Anti-müllerian Hormone (AMH) and Hormonal Assays for Phenotypic Classification of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2020-10-19

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2020.0122

Keywords

polycystic ovary syndrome
phenotype
polycystic ovarian morphology
anti müllerian hormone
hyperandrogenism

Authors

Ali Cenk Ozay
Ozlen Emekcı Ozay
Bulent Gulekli

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