open access

Vol 89, No 12 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-12-28
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Diagnostic and prognostic relevance of microparticles in peripheral and uterine blood of patients with endometrial cancer

Marek Dziechciowski, Barbara Zapala, Krzysztof Skotniczny, Katarzyna Gawlik, Dorota Pawlica-Gosiewska, Monika Piwowar, Marta Balajewicz-Nowak, Pawel Basta, Bogdan Solnica, Kazimierz Pitynski
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0115
·
Pubmed: 30618036
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(12):682-687.

open access

Vol 89, No 12 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-12-28

Abstract

Objectives: Exosomes — microvesicles which are secreted by living cells — can be produced from different cell types and detected in various body fluids. They are the carriers of intercellular information which regulate tumor microenvironment and are considered to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis. Cancer cells can secrete more exosomes than healthy cells, and are expected to be potential tools for tumor diagnosis and treatment.
Material and methods: In this report, we present the results of microparticle analysis in peripheral and uterine blood of patients with endometrial cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this study has been the first to report microvesicle status in peripheral and uterine blood samples. The aim of the study was to determine the amount of total (TF+), endothelial (CD144+) and monocytic (CD14+) microparticles. The counting of the selected microparticles in citrate plasma was performed using flow cytometry on the BD Canto II cytometer.
Results: We found that the total amount of microparticles in cancer patients was much higher than in healthy controls. Moreover, microparticle count in uterine blood was higher than in peripheral blood of patients with endometrial cancer. We
also demonstrated that the amount of microparticles correlates with the histologic grade and clinical stage of the tumor.
Conclusions: The most interesting finding in this work was the high level of TF, CD144 and CD14 MPs in uterine blood samples. Thus we can consider the monocyte-macrophage-derived MPs as a candidate marker of endometrial cancer and maybe very critical part of the endometrial carcinogenesis.

Abstract

Objectives: Exosomes — microvesicles which are secreted by living cells — can be produced from different cell types and detected in various body fluids. They are the carriers of intercellular information which regulate tumor microenvironment and are considered to be involved in tumor progression and metastasis. Cancer cells can secrete more exosomes than healthy cells, and are expected to be potential tools for tumor diagnosis and treatment.
Material and methods: In this report, we present the results of microparticle analysis in peripheral and uterine blood of patients with endometrial cancer. To the best of our knowledge, this study has been the first to report microvesicle status in peripheral and uterine blood samples. The aim of the study was to determine the amount of total (TF+), endothelial (CD144+) and monocytic (CD14+) microparticles. The counting of the selected microparticles in citrate plasma was performed using flow cytometry on the BD Canto II cytometer.
Results: We found that the total amount of microparticles in cancer patients was much higher than in healthy controls. Moreover, microparticle count in uterine blood was higher than in peripheral blood of patients with endometrial cancer. We
also demonstrated that the amount of microparticles correlates with the histologic grade and clinical stage of the tumor.
Conclusions: The most interesting finding in this work was the high level of TF, CD144 and CD14 MPs in uterine blood samples. Thus we can consider the monocyte-macrophage-derived MPs as a candidate marker of endometrial cancer and maybe very critical part of the endometrial carcinogenesis.

Get Citation

Keywords

endometrial cancer; exosomes; microparticles; biomarkers

About this article
Title

Diagnostic and prognostic relevance of microparticles in peripheral and uterine blood of patients with endometrial cancer

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 12 (2018)

Pages

682-687

Published online

2018-12-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0115

Pubmed

30618036

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(12):682-687.

Keywords

endometrial cancer
exosomes
microparticles
biomarkers

Authors

Marek Dziechciowski
Barbara Zapala
Krzysztof Skotniczny
Katarzyna Gawlik
Dorota Pawlica-Gosiewska
Monika Piwowar
Marta Balajewicz-Nowak
Pawel Basta
Bogdan Solnica
Kazimierz Pitynski

References (17)
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