open access

Vol 89, No 12 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-12-28
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Stage IB1 cervical cancer treated with modified radical or radical hysterectomy: does size determine risk factors?

Varol Gülseren, Mustafa Kocaer, Özgü Güngördük, İsa Aykut Özdemir, Ceren Gölbaşı, Adnan Budak, İlker Çakır, Mehmet Gökçü, Muzaffer Sancı, Kemal Güngördük
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0112
·
Pubmed: 30618033
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(12):667-671.

open access

Vol 89, No 12 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-12-28

Abstract

Objectives: This study was performed to investigate prognostic factors status at smaller tumors in patients with stageIB1 cervical cancer (CC) who underwent modified radical or radical hysterectomy.
Matherial and metods: Data from patients diagnosed with CC between January 1995 and January 2017 at the GynecologicalOncology Department, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital and Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital,Istanbul, Turkey, were investigated. A total of 182 stage IB1 CC cases were evaluated retrospectively.
Results: Patients were divided into two groups according to tumor size (< 2 cm and ≥ 2 cm). There were no complicationsassociated with the operation in patients with a tumor size < 2 cm. Among patients with a tumor size ≥ 2 cm, however, 0.9% (n = 1) developed bladder laceration, 0.9% (n = 1) rectum laceration, and 0.9% (n = 1) pulmonary emboli (P = 0.583). The rates of intermediate risk factors (depth of stromal invasion and lymphovascular space invasion) were significantly higher and lymph node involvement significantly more frequent in patients with a tumor size ≥ 2 cm. However, there were no significant differences in parametrial invasion or vaginal margin involvement between the two groups.
Conclusions: Intermediate risk factors and lymph node metastasis were significantly less frequent in patients with small
tumors measuring < 2 cm. However, although parametrial involvement and vaginal margin involvement were less common in patients with small tumors compared with large tumors (≥ 2 cm), the differences were not significant.

Abstract

Objectives: This study was performed to investigate prognostic factors status at smaller tumors in patients with stageIB1 cervical cancer (CC) who underwent modified radical or radical hysterectomy.
Matherial and metods: Data from patients diagnosed with CC between January 1995 and January 2017 at the GynecologicalOncology Department, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital and Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital,Istanbul, Turkey, were investigated. A total of 182 stage IB1 CC cases were evaluated retrospectively.
Results: Patients were divided into two groups according to tumor size (< 2 cm and ≥ 2 cm). There were no complicationsassociated with the operation in patients with a tumor size < 2 cm. Among patients with a tumor size ≥ 2 cm, however, 0.9% (n = 1) developed bladder laceration, 0.9% (n = 1) rectum laceration, and 0.9% (n = 1) pulmonary emboli (P = 0.583). The rates of intermediate risk factors (depth of stromal invasion and lymphovascular space invasion) were significantly higher and lymph node involvement significantly more frequent in patients with a tumor size ≥ 2 cm. However, there were no significant differences in parametrial invasion or vaginal margin involvement between the two groups.
Conclusions: Intermediate risk factors and lymph node metastasis were significantly less frequent in patients with small
tumors measuring < 2 cm. However, although parametrial involvement and vaginal margin involvement were less common in patients with small tumors compared with large tumors (≥ 2 cm), the differences were not significant.

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Keywords

cervical cancer; radical hysterectomy; parametrial involvment

About this article
Title

Stage IB1 cervical cancer treated with modified radical or radical hysterectomy: does size determine risk factors?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 12 (2018)

Pages

667-671

Published online

2018-12-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0112

Pubmed

30618033

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(12):667-671.

Keywords

cervical cancer
radical hysterectomy
parametrial involvment

Authors

Varol Gülseren
Mustafa Kocaer
Özgü Güngördük
İsa Aykut Özdemir
Ceren Gölbaşı
Adnan Budak
İlker Çakır
Mehmet Gökçü
Muzaffer Sancı
Kemal Güngördük

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