open access

Vol 89, No 11 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-11-30
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Dietary vitamin and mineral intakes in a sample of pregnant women with either gestational diabetes or type 1 diabetes mellitus, assessed in comparison with Polish nutritional guidelines

Aleksandra Kozlowska, Anna Maja Jagielska, Katarzyna Malgorzata Okreglicka, Filip Dabrowski, Krzysztof Kanecki, Aneta Nitsch-Osuch, Miroslaw Wielgos, Dorota Bomba-Opon
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0100
·
Pubmed: 30508208
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(11):581-586.

open access

Vol 89, No 11 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-11-30

Abstract

Objectives: Maintaining proper nutrition during pregnancy is crucial for pregnant women and especially for who have
been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or who develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
Material and methods: To measure differences in vitamin and mineral intakes among women with normal pregnancies,
pregnant women with GDM, and pregnant women with pre-gestational T1DM; and to assess the women’s dietary intakes in comparison with Polish nutritional guidelines. The analysis was conducted among 83 pregnant women (29 GDM patients, 26 T1DM patients and 28 normal pregnancy participants) from whom we collected seven-day 24-hour dietary records during the second part of their pregnancies.
Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed for most of the vitamin and mineral intakes across the three groups. However, we did observe a significant difference in the vitamin C and calcium intakes between groups. The mean vitamin C and calcium intakes were significantly higher in the control group than among the diabetic patients. Insufficient dietary calcium intakes were found among 52.3% of the GDM patients and 61.6% of the T1DM participants, while only 28.6% of the normal pregnancy patients experienced a calcium deficiency. The highest incidence of inadequate intake in each of the GDM, T1DM and control groups was observed for vitamin D (100%, 100%, 100%), folate (97.7%, 100%, 100%), iron (97.7%, 100%, 100%), and iodine (97.7%, 92.4%, 85.7%), respectively.
Conclusions: Diet alone may not be enough to provide adequate levels of vitamins and minerals for most micronutrients. Supplement use reduces the risk of inadequate intake for many micronutrients, but diet-related issues during pregnancy and pregnancy diagnosed with diabetes remain, and they deserve to be addressed during public health interventions.

Abstract

Objectives: Maintaining proper nutrition during pregnancy is crucial for pregnant women and especially for who have
been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or who develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).
Material and methods: To measure differences in vitamin and mineral intakes among women with normal pregnancies,
pregnant women with GDM, and pregnant women with pre-gestational T1DM; and to assess the women’s dietary intakes in comparison with Polish nutritional guidelines. The analysis was conducted among 83 pregnant women (29 GDM patients, 26 T1DM patients and 28 normal pregnancy participants) from whom we collected seven-day 24-hour dietary records during the second part of their pregnancies.
Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed for most of the vitamin and mineral intakes across the three groups. However, we did observe a significant difference in the vitamin C and calcium intakes between groups. The mean vitamin C and calcium intakes were significantly higher in the control group than among the diabetic patients. Insufficient dietary calcium intakes were found among 52.3% of the GDM patients and 61.6% of the T1DM participants, while only 28.6% of the normal pregnancy patients experienced a calcium deficiency. The highest incidence of inadequate intake in each of the GDM, T1DM and control groups was observed for vitamin D (100%, 100%, 100%), folate (97.7%, 100%, 100%), iron (97.7%, 100%, 100%), and iodine (97.7%, 92.4%, 85.7%), respectively.
Conclusions: Diet alone may not be enough to provide adequate levels of vitamins and minerals for most micronutrients. Supplement use reduces the risk of inadequate intake for many micronutrients, but diet-related issues during pregnancy and pregnancy diagnosed with diabetes remain, and they deserve to be addressed during public health interventions.

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Keywords

maternal diet; GDM; T1DM; vitamins inatkes; mienrals intakes

About this article
Title

Dietary vitamin and mineral intakes in a sample of pregnant women with either gestational diabetes or type 1 diabetes mellitus, assessed in comparison with Polish nutritional guidelines

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 11 (2018)

Pages

581-586

Published online

2018-11-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0100

Pubmed

30508208

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(11):581-586.

Keywords

maternal diet
GDM
T1DM
vitamins inatkes
mienrals intakes

Authors

Aleksandra Kozlowska
Anna Maja Jagielska
Katarzyna Malgorzata Okreglicka
Filip Dabrowski
Krzysztof Kanecki
Aneta Nitsch-Osuch
Miroslaw Wielgos
Dorota Bomba-Opon

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