open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-09-28
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Dietary supplementation usage by pregnant women in Silesia — population based study

Anna Knapik, Krzysztof Kocot, Andrzej Witek, Mateusz Jankowski, Agnieszka Wróblewska-Czech, Malgorzata Kowalska, Jan Eugeniusz Zejda, Grzegorz Brożek
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0086
·
Pubmed: 30318578
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):506-512.

open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-09-28

Abstract

Objectives: Despite wide access to gynecological and obstetric advice, informational campaigns, and information online and in magazines aimed at pregnant women, there is a worryingly high percentage of women who still do not use recommended dietary supplementation. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of micronutrient supplementation by pregnant women and to specify the determinants that impact decisions concerning supplementation.

Material and methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted between June 2016 and May 2017 among a group of pregnant women visiting gynecological and obstetric clinics in the Silesia region, who have completed an authorized questionnaire developed for the purpose of this study. The questionnaire addressed the women’s dietary habits, micronutrient supplementation use, as well as their socio-economic status. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 505 pregnant women.

Results: Microminerals and vitamins supplementation during pregnancy was declared by 410 (81.2%) women. The most often used supplement was folic acid (62%). More than one-third of pregnant women (38.4%) declared vitamin D intake. Among the recommended supplements, the least commonly used (30.3%) were polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Factors contributing to supplementation use during pregnancy are past history of miscarriage and socioeconomic factors, such as: place of residence, financial situation and level of education. Inhabitants of larger cities, women with better self-perceived financial situations, higher education levels and those presenting past history of miscarriage took the supplements significantly more often.

Conclusions: Lower levels of education, low-income financial status and living in rural localities are among the factors correlating with worse adherence to supplementation guidelines.

Abstract

Objectives: Despite wide access to gynecological and obstetric advice, informational campaigns, and information online and in magazines aimed at pregnant women, there is a worryingly high percentage of women who still do not use recommended dietary supplementation. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of micronutrient supplementation by pregnant women and to specify the determinants that impact decisions concerning supplementation.

Material and methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted between June 2016 and May 2017 among a group of pregnant women visiting gynecological and obstetric clinics in the Silesia region, who have completed an authorized questionnaire developed for the purpose of this study. The questionnaire addressed the women’s dietary habits, micronutrient supplementation use, as well as their socio-economic status. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 505 pregnant women.

Results: Microminerals and vitamins supplementation during pregnancy was declared by 410 (81.2%) women. The most often used supplement was folic acid (62%). More than one-third of pregnant women (38.4%) declared vitamin D intake. Among the recommended supplements, the least commonly used (30.3%) were polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Factors contributing to supplementation use during pregnancy are past history of miscarriage and socioeconomic factors, such as: place of residence, financial situation and level of education. Inhabitants of larger cities, women with better self-perceived financial situations, higher education levels and those presenting past history of miscarriage took the supplements significantly more often.

Conclusions: Lower levels of education, low-income financial status and living in rural localities are among the factors correlating with worse adherence to supplementation guidelines.

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Keywords

dietary supplements, supplementation, pregnancy, nourishment

About this article
Title

Dietary supplementation usage by pregnant women in Silesia — population based study

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)

Pages

506-512

Published online

2018-09-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0086

Pubmed

30318578

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):506-512.

Keywords

dietary supplements
supplementation
pregnancy
nourishment

Authors

Anna Knapik
Krzysztof Kocot
Andrzej Witek
Mateusz Jankowski
Agnieszka Wróblewska-Czech
Malgorzata Kowalska
Jan Eugeniusz Zejda
Grzegorz Brożek

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