open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-09-28
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Pre-vaccination prevalence of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) in women from Kosovo and their related sociodemographic characteristics

Pranvera Zejnullahu Raçi, Lea Hošnjak, Mario Poljak, Snježana Židovec Lepej, Adriana Vince
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0083
·
Pubmed: 30318575
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):485-494.

open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-09-28

Abstract

Objectives: Kosovo’s current health care system does not support organized nationwide cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs. To date, no reliable data are available on cervical cancer incidence and mortality in Kosovo, or on high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) prevalence and HPV type distribution. Our aim is to determinate the pre-vaccination prevalence and distribution of HR-HPVs and to assesses the associations between sociodemographic characteristics and increased risk of HPV infection in women from Kosovo.

Material and methods: Detection of HR-HPV DNA in cytologically evaluated cervical smears was performed using a clinically validated Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test, Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test, HPV52 type-specific real-time PCR and an in-house GP5+/GP6+/68 PCR.

Results: The crude overall prevalence of any of the HR-HPVs was estimated at 13.1% (26/199; 95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1–18.5%), with HPV16 being the most common type (7/26, 26.9%), followed by HPV31 and HPV51, each detected in 4/26 (15.4%) cervical specimens, HPV18, detected in 3/26 (11.5%) specimens, HPV52 and HPV66, each detected in 2/26 (7.7%) specimens, and HPV33, HPV45, HPV56, and HPV58, each detected in a single (3.9%) specimen. Women over 40 (OR = 0.36), older than 18 at sexual debut (odds ratio (OR) = 0.28), those that had delivered at least one child (OR = 0.32), and those that had a history of pregnancy termination (OR = 0.39) were at lower risk for HPV infection.

Conclusion: Because more than 70% of cervical precancerous lesions could have been prevented in Kosovo using nationwide HPV-based cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination, it is of outmost importance to implement both programs in the national health care system as soon as possible.

Abstract

Objectives: Kosovo’s current health care system does not support organized nationwide cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs. To date, no reliable data are available on cervical cancer incidence and mortality in Kosovo, or on high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) prevalence and HPV type distribution. Our aim is to determinate the pre-vaccination prevalence and distribution of HR-HPVs and to assesses the associations between sociodemographic characteristics and increased risk of HPV infection in women from Kosovo.

Material and methods: Detection of HR-HPV DNA in cytologically evaluated cervical smears was performed using a clinically validated Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV test, Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test, HPV52 type-specific real-time PCR and an in-house GP5+/GP6+/68 PCR.

Results: The crude overall prevalence of any of the HR-HPVs was estimated at 13.1% (26/199; 95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1–18.5%), with HPV16 being the most common type (7/26, 26.9%), followed by HPV31 and HPV51, each detected in 4/26 (15.4%) cervical specimens, HPV18, detected in 3/26 (11.5%) specimens, HPV52 and HPV66, each detected in 2/26 (7.7%) specimens, and HPV33, HPV45, HPV56, and HPV58, each detected in a single (3.9%) specimen. Women over 40 (OR = 0.36), older than 18 at sexual debut (odds ratio (OR) = 0.28), those that had delivered at least one child (OR = 0.32), and those that had a history of pregnancy termination (OR = 0.39) were at lower risk for HPV infection.

Conclusion: Because more than 70% of cervical precancerous lesions could have been prevented in Kosovo using nationwide HPV-based cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination, it is of outmost importance to implement both programs in the national health care system as soon as possible.

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Keywords

cervical cancer, high-risk human papillomaviruses, Kosovo, prevalence, vaccination

About this article
Title

Pre-vaccination prevalence of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) in women from Kosovo and their related sociodemographic characteristics

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)

Pages

485-494

Published online

2018-09-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0083

Pubmed

30318575

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):485-494.

Keywords

cervical cancer
high-risk human papillomaviruses
Kosovo
prevalence
vaccination

Authors

Pranvera Zejnullahu Raçi
Lea Hošnjak
Mario Poljak
Snježana Židovec Lepej
Adriana Vince

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