open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-09-28
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Occult uterine malignancy during laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

Iwona Gawron, Krzysztof Skotniczny, Artur Ludwin
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0080
·
Pubmed: 30318572
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):467-474.

open access

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-09-28

Abstract

Objectives: To estimate the incidence of occult uterine malignancies during laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH).

Material and methods: Retrospective cohort study based on archival data (2010–2016) of the Department of Gynecology and Oncology, Jagiellonian University.

Results: Medical records of 696 women, who underwent LSH were analyzed. Two occult sarcomas (2/696; 0.29%, 0.003, 95% CI: 0.001 to 0.01), including one case of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) with co-occurring atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AH) and one case of high-grade ESS were found postoperatively. One case of invasive primary fallopian tube cancer (1/696; 0.14%, 0.001, 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.008) and additional three cases of AH (3/696; 0.57%, 0.004, 95% CI: 0.001 to 0.013) were also identified. No case of EC was documented. One hundred sixty nine (24.3%) women of 696 had an endometrial sampling prior LSH including these with ESS. We did not observe worsening of the prognosis and all patients with confirmed malignancy are still alive and free from recurrence in 2–5 years of observations.

Conclusions: Most commonly the occult malignancy would have not been recognized if the surgery had not been conducted. When appropriate diagnostics is conducted, rare incidents of malignant tissue morcellation should not be considered as a professional misconduct but as a possible adverse event. Patients should be informed about the risk of malignancy according to available estimations and that endometrial sampling cannot eliminate such a risk. A consensus regarding safe indications, required diagnostics, and justifiability of mandatory use of contained morcellation for LSH should be developed.

Abstract

Objectives: To estimate the incidence of occult uterine malignancies during laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH).

Material and methods: Retrospective cohort study based on archival data (2010–2016) of the Department of Gynecology and Oncology, Jagiellonian University.

Results: Medical records of 696 women, who underwent LSH were analyzed. Two occult sarcomas (2/696; 0.29%, 0.003, 95% CI: 0.001 to 0.01), including one case of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) with co-occurring atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AH) and one case of high-grade ESS were found postoperatively. One case of invasive primary fallopian tube cancer (1/696; 0.14%, 0.001, 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.008) and additional three cases of AH (3/696; 0.57%, 0.004, 95% CI: 0.001 to 0.013) were also identified. No case of EC was documented. One hundred sixty nine (24.3%) women of 696 had an endometrial sampling prior LSH including these with ESS. We did not observe worsening of the prognosis and all patients with confirmed malignancy are still alive and free from recurrence in 2–5 years of observations.

Conclusions: Most commonly the occult malignancy would have not been recognized if the surgery had not been conducted. When appropriate diagnostics is conducted, rare incidents of malignant tissue morcellation should not be considered as a professional misconduct but as a possible adverse event. Patients should be informed about the risk of malignancy according to available estimations and that endometrial sampling cannot eliminate such a risk. A consensus regarding safe indications, required diagnostics, and justifiability of mandatory use of contained morcellation for LSH should be developed.

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Keywords

laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy, power morcellation, occult malignancy

About this article
Title

Occult uterine malignancy during laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 9 (2018)

Pages

467-474

Published online

2018-09-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0080

Pubmed

30318572

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(9):467-474.

Keywords

laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy
power morcellation
occult malignancy

Authors

Iwona Gawron
Krzysztof Skotniczny
Artur Ludwin

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