open access

Vol 89, No 8 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-08-31
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Does Home Birth Reduce the Risk of Pelvic Organ Prolapse?

Nuri Peker1, Baki Erdem2, Alpaslan Kaban3
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0074
·
Pubmed: 30215462
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(8):433-437.
Affiliations
  1. Uşak Training and Research Hospital
  2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Saglik Bilimleri University, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital,, Istanbul, Turkey
  3. Süleymaniye Training and Research Hospital, zeytiburnu, 34000 istanbul, Turkey

open access

Vol 89, No 8 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-08-31

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the relationship between vaginal birth and the development of POP among women who deliv­ered in non-hospital settings (home birth).

Material and methods: Data were collected retrospectively from the files of patients who presented to a hospital outpatient clinic between April 1, 2011 and April 1, 2012 with complaints of urinary incontinence, uterine sagging, vaginal mass, or vaginal pain. The patients’ age, height, weight, body mass index, menopause age, number of deliveries, and presence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus were noted. Patients whose urogynecologic evaluation included POP Quantification (POP-Q) scoring were included in the study. The patients were separated into a group of women who had never given birth and another group of women with one or more deliveries.

Results: Of the 179 patients in the study, 28 had never given birth and 151 had given birth at least once. The nulliparous patients had no cystocele, rectocele, or uterine prolapse. The prevalence rates of cystocele, rectocele, and uterine prolapse were significantly higher in the multiparous group. Cystocele, rectocele, and uterine prolapse development were significantly correlated with number of deliveries, but there was no statistical association with age, body mass index, menopausal age, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension. univariate analysis reveals that the only factor effective in the development of cytocele, rectocele and prolapse is the number of births.

Conclusions: Our study suggests that only number of deliveries is associated with development of cystocele, rectocele, and uterine prolapse in women who gave birth by vaginal route in residential settings.

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the relationship between vaginal birth and the development of POP among women who deliv­ered in non-hospital settings (home birth).

Material and methods: Data were collected retrospectively from the files of patients who presented to a hospital outpatient clinic between April 1, 2011 and April 1, 2012 with complaints of urinary incontinence, uterine sagging, vaginal mass, or vaginal pain. The patients’ age, height, weight, body mass index, menopause age, number of deliveries, and presence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus were noted. Patients whose urogynecologic evaluation included POP Quantification (POP-Q) scoring were included in the study. The patients were separated into a group of women who had never given birth and another group of women with one or more deliveries.

Results: Of the 179 patients in the study, 28 had never given birth and 151 had given birth at least once. The nulliparous patients had no cystocele, rectocele, or uterine prolapse. The prevalence rates of cystocele, rectocele, and uterine prolapse were significantly higher in the multiparous group. Cystocele, rectocele, and uterine prolapse development were significantly correlated with number of deliveries, but there was no statistical association with age, body mass index, menopausal age, diabetes mellitus, or hypertension. univariate analysis reveals that the only factor effective in the development of cytocele, rectocele and prolapse is the number of births.

Conclusions: Our study suggests that only number of deliveries is associated with development of cystocele, rectocele, and uterine prolapse in women who gave birth by vaginal route in residential settings.

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Keywords

POP-Q, cystocele, rectocele, uterine prolapse, vaginal delivery, home birth

About this article
Title

Does Home Birth Reduce the Risk of Pelvic Organ Prolapse?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 8 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

433-437

Published online

2018-08-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0074

Pubmed

30215462

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(8):433-437.

Keywords

POP-Q
cystocele
rectocele
uterine prolapse
vaginal delivery
home birth

Authors

Nuri Peker
Baki Erdem
Alpaslan Kaban

References (19)
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