open access

Vol 89, No 8 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-08-31
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Serum levels of circulating miRNA-21, miRNA-10b and miRNA-200c in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Sebastian Niedźwiecki1, Janusz Piekarski1, Bożena Szymańska2, Zofia Pawłowska2, Arkadiusz Jeziorski1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0071
·
Pubmed: 30215459
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(8):415-420.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland, ul. Paderewskiego 4, 93-509 Łódź, Poland
  2. Central Scientific Laboratory, Medical University of Lodz, Poland, ul. Mazowiecka 6/8, 92-215 Łódź, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 8 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-08-31

Abstract

Introduction: Breast cancer can be classified into five subtypes based on variations in the status of three hormonal receptors that are responsible for the cancer’s heterogeneity: estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These classifications influence the choice of therapies (either neoadjuvant or adjuvant), and the range of prognoses, from good (luminal A subtype) to poor (triple-negative cancers).

Objective: The aim of the study was to compare the serum concentration of selected miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-10b, and miRNA-200c) between in two groups of breast cancer patients with differing ER, PR, and HER2 statuses.

Materials and methods: The study was performed on two groups of patients. One group (TNBC) consisted of patients with triple-negative cancer, and the other group (ER(+)/PR(+)) was comprised of patients with positive ER and PR receptors.

Results: The mean level of miRNA-200c was significantly higher in the ER(+)/PR(+) group than in the TNBC group (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with regard to the mean levels of miRNA-21 or miRNA-10b.

Conclusion: The level of miRNA-200c was lower in triple-negative patients when compared with the levels in the study’s ER/PR positive group.

Abstract

Introduction: Breast cancer can be classified into five subtypes based on variations in the status of three hormonal receptors that are responsible for the cancer’s heterogeneity: estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). These classifications influence the choice of therapies (either neoadjuvant or adjuvant), and the range of prognoses, from good (luminal A subtype) to poor (triple-negative cancers).

Objective: The aim of the study was to compare the serum concentration of selected miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-10b, and miRNA-200c) between in two groups of breast cancer patients with differing ER, PR, and HER2 statuses.

Materials and methods: The study was performed on two groups of patients. One group (TNBC) consisted of patients with triple-negative cancer, and the other group (ER(+)/PR(+)) was comprised of patients with positive ER and PR receptors.

Results: The mean level of miRNA-200c was significantly higher in the ER(+)/PR(+) group than in the TNBC group (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with regard to the mean levels of miRNA-21 or miRNA-10b.

Conclusion: The level of miRNA-200c was lower in triple-negative patients when compared with the levels in the study’s ER/PR positive group.

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Keywords

miRNA, breast cancer, receptors, biomarker, triple negative

About this article
Title

Serum levels of circulating miRNA-21, miRNA-10b and miRNA-200c in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 8 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

415-420

Published online

2018-08-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0071

Pubmed

30215459

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(8):415-420.

Keywords

miRNA
breast cancer
receptors
biomarker
triple negative

Authors

Sebastian Niedźwiecki
Janusz Piekarski
Bożena Szymańska
Zofia Pawłowska
Arkadiusz Jeziorski

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