open access

Vol 91, No 9 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-09-30
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Intrapartum PCR assay is a fast and efficient screening method for Group B Streptococcus detection in pregnancy

Maciej Zietek, Joanna Jaroszewicz-Trzaska, Malgorzata Szczuko, Radoslaw Mantiuk, Zbigniew Celewicz
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2020.0088
·
Pubmed: 33030736
·
Ginekol Pol 2020;91(9):549-553.

open access

Vol 91, No 9 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-09-30

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study is to verify the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction versus the culture for
ante- and intrapartum group B Streptococcus maternal colonization (GBS) and prevalence of discordance during the period
between an antepartum screening and delivery.
Material and methods: The study involved 106 pregnant women aged 18 to 39 years. Rectovaginal samples were collected
according to CDC guidelines at 35–37 weeks of gestation as well as in the first stage of labour, during physical examination
and were analyzed using two independent diagnostic methods: microbiological culture with standard culture and
polymerase chain reaction with real-time assay.
Results: The discordance between antenatal and intrapartum GBS prevalence has been demonstrated as well as differences
associated with diagnostic strategies, culture and PCR.
Conclusions: Intrapartum detection of GBS colonization using culture or Real-Time PCR assay as well, regardless of antenatal
screening test for GBS, is very useful in identifying women who require implementation or withdrawal from prophylactic
intrapartum antibiotic therapy. Real-Time PCR is a quick efficient method for GBS screening in pregnant women, which
can be even applied during labor due to its short time of analyzing and high sensitivity and specificity. The above fact may
indicate the need to perform the GBS test in the intrapartum period in all pregnant GBS negative women using PCR assay
as a more adequate diagnostic method as the procedure could reduce the risk of a neonatal GBS infection subsequently
to a prophylactic antibiotic therapy in women with an intrapartum positive GBS.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study is to verify the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction versus the culture for
ante- and intrapartum group B Streptococcus maternal colonization (GBS) and prevalence of discordance during the period
between an antepartum screening and delivery.
Material and methods: The study involved 106 pregnant women aged 18 to 39 years. Rectovaginal samples were collected
according to CDC guidelines at 35–37 weeks of gestation as well as in the first stage of labour, during physical examination
and were analyzed using two independent diagnostic methods: microbiological culture with standard culture and
polymerase chain reaction with real-time assay.
Results: The discordance between antenatal and intrapartum GBS prevalence has been demonstrated as well as differences
associated with diagnostic strategies, culture and PCR.
Conclusions: Intrapartum detection of GBS colonization using culture or Real-Time PCR assay as well, regardless of antenatal
screening test for GBS, is very useful in identifying women who require implementation or withdrawal from prophylactic
intrapartum antibiotic therapy. Real-Time PCR is a quick efficient method for GBS screening in pregnant women, which
can be even applied during labor due to its short time of analyzing and high sensitivity and specificity. The above fact may
indicate the need to perform the GBS test in the intrapartum period in all pregnant GBS negative women using PCR assay
as a more adequate diagnostic method as the procedure could reduce the risk of a neonatal GBS infection subsequently
to a prophylactic antibiotic therapy in women with an intrapartum positive GBS.

Get Citation

Keywords

group B Streptococcus; vaginal colonization; real-time polymerase chain reaction; pregnancy

About this article
Title

Intrapartum PCR assay is a fast and efficient screening method for Group B Streptococcus detection in pregnancy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 91, No 9 (2020)

Pages

549-553

Published online

2020-09-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2020.0088

Pubmed

33030736

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2020;91(9):549-553.

Keywords

group B Streptococcus
vaginal colonization
real-time polymerase chain reaction
pregnancy

Authors

Maciej Zietek
Joanna Jaroszewicz-Trzaska
Malgorzata Szczuko
Radoslaw Mantiuk
Zbigniew Celewicz

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