open access

Vol 91, No 9 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-09-30
Get Citation

The concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 in pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension and/or intrauterine hypotrophy

Patrycja K. Gazy, Sylwia Marciniak, Helena Slawska, Anita Olejek, Bogdan Mazur
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2020.0087
·
Pubmed: 33030735
·
Ginekol Pol 2020;91(9):544-548.

open access

Vol 91, No 9 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-09-30

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1)concentration in pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension and/or intrauterine hypotrophy, and its correlation with maternal pressure and umbilical artery pulsatility and resistance indices. Material and methods: 65 pairs pregnant-newborn were included to four groups: I — control, II — PIH, III — Hypotrophy, IV — PIH and Hypotrophy. In the study we analyzed cord blood IGF-1 concentration, newborns antropometry, umbilical artery pulsatility and resistance indices and maternal pressure before delivery. Results: The concentration of IGF-1 was the lowest in IV group of hypotrophic newborns from pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension. In this group of patients there was strong negative correlation between IGF-1 concentration and maternal systolic and diastolic pressure. Conclusions: There is a strong negative correlation between IGF-1 concentration and maternal systolic pressure in group of hypotrophic newborns from pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1)concentration in pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension and/or intrauterine hypotrophy, and its correlation with maternal pressure and umbilical artery pulsatility and resistance indices. Material and methods: 65 pairs pregnant-newborn were included to four groups: I — control, II — PIH, III — Hypotrophy, IV — PIH and Hypotrophy. In the study we analyzed cord blood IGF-1 concentration, newborns antropometry, umbilical artery pulsatility and resistance indices and maternal pressure before delivery. Results: The concentration of IGF-1 was the lowest in IV group of hypotrophic newborns from pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension. In this group of patients there was strong negative correlation between IGF-1 concentration and maternal systolic and diastolic pressure. Conclusions: There is a strong negative correlation between IGF-1 concentration and maternal systolic pressure in group of hypotrophic newborns from pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension.

Get Citation

Keywords

intrauterine growth restriction; pregnancy-induced hypertension; insulin-like growth factor-1

About this article
Title

The concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 in pregnancies complicated by pregnancy-induced hypertension and/or intrauterine hypotrophy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 91, No 9 (2020)

Pages

544-548

Published online

2020-09-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2020.0087

Pubmed

33030735

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2020;91(9):544-548.

Keywords

intrauterine growth restriction
pregnancy-induced hypertension
insulin-like growth factor-1

Authors

Patrycja K. Gazy
Sylwia Marciniak
Helena Slawska
Anita Olejek
Bogdan Mazur

References (23)
  1. Xiong Xu, Buekens P, Pridjian G, et al. Pregnancy-induced hypertension and perinatal mortality. J Reprod Med. 2007; 52(5): 402–406.
  2. Baschat AA. Neurodevelopment following fetal growth restriction and its relationship with antepartum parameters of placental dysfunction. Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2011; 37(5): 501–514.
  3. Ananth CV, Basso O. Impact of pregnancy-induced hypertension on stillbirth and neonatal mortality. Epidemiology. 2010; 21(1): 118–123.
  4. Kornacki J, Skrzypczak J. [Preeclampsia--two manifestations of the same disease]. Ginekol Pol. 2008; 79(6): 432–437.
  5. Heimrath J, Czekański A, Krawczenko A, et al. [The role of endothelium in the pathogenesis of pregnancy-induced hypertension]. Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online). 2007; 61: 48–57.
  6. Granger JP, Alexander BT, Llinas MT, et al. Pathophysiology of preeclampsia: linking placental ischemia/hypoxia with microvascular dysfunction. Microcirculation. 2002; 9(3): 147–160.
  7. Figueras F, Caradeux J, Crispi F, et al. Diagnosis and surveillance of late-onset fetal growth restriction. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2018; 218(2S): S790–S802.e1.
  8. Sieroszewski P, Guzowski G. [Prognostic value of the uterine doppler velocimetry at 20-24 gestation weeks for PIH and IUGR development in pregnancy]. Ginekol Pol. 2005; 76(5): 348–357.
  9. Milio LA, Hu J, Douglas GC. Binding of insulin-like growth factor I to human trophoblast cells during differentiation in vitro. Placenta. 1994; 15(6): 641–651.
  10. Bach LA. Endothelial cells and the IGF system. J Mol Endocrinol. 2015; 54(1): R1–13.
  11. Tivesten A, Bollano E, Andersson I, et al. Liver-derived insulin-like growth factor-I is involved in the regulation of blood pressure in mice. Endocrinology. 2002; 143(11): 4235–4242.
  12. Zeng G, Quon MJ. Insulin-stimulated production of nitric oxide is inhibited by wortmannin. Direct measurement in vascular endothelial cells. J Clin Invest. 1996; 98(4): 894–898.
  13. Halhali A, Díaz L, Barrera D, et al. Placental calcitriol synthesis and IGF-I levels in normal and preeclamptic pregnancies. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2014; 144 Pt A: 44–49.
  14. Olmos A, Díaz L, Avila E, et al. Associations between insulin-like growth factor I, vascular endothelial growth factor and its soluble receptor 1 in umbilical serum and endothelial cells obtained from normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies. Growth Factors. 2013; 31(4): 123–129.
  15. Dubova EA, Pavlov KA, Lyapin VM, et al. Expression of insulin-like growth factors in the placenta in preeclampsia. Bull Exp Biol Med. 2014; 157(1): 103–107.
  16. Sifakis S, Akolekar R, Kappou D, et al. Maternal serum insulin-like growth factor-I at 11-13 weeks in preeclampsia. Prenat Diagn. 2010; 30(11): 1026–1031.
  17. Barker DJ. The fetal and infant origins of adult disease. BMJ. 1990; 301(6761): 1111.
  18. Styrud J, Eriksson UJ, Grill V, et al. Experimental intrauterine growth retardation in the rat causes a reduction of pancreatic B-cell mass, which persists into adulthood. Biol Neonate. 2005; 88(2): 122–128.
  19. Mohan R, Baumann D, Alejandro EUy. Fetal undernutrition, placental insufficiency, and pancreatic β-cell development programming in utero. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2018; 315(5): R867–R878.
  20. Bertin E, Gangnerau MN, Bellon G, et al. Development of beta-cell mass in fetuses of rats deprived of protein and/or energy in last trimester of pregnancy. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2002; 283(3): R623–R630.
  21. Jones CT, Lafeber HN, Roebuck MM. Studies on the growth of the fetal guinea pig. Changes in plasma hormone concentration during normal and abnormal growth. J Dev Physiol. 1984; 6(6): 461–472.
  22. Jones CT. 55Lafeber HN, 55Rolph TP, 55Parer JT. Studies on the growth of the fetalguineapig. The effects of nutritional manipulation on prenatal growth and plasma somatomedin activity and insulin-like growth factor concentrations. J DevPhysiol. 1990; 13(4): 189–197.
  23. Wikström AK, Stephansson O, Cnattingius S. Previous preeclampsia and risks of adverse outcomes in subsequent nonpreeclamptic pregnancies. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011; 204(2): 148.e1–148.e6.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl