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Vol 91, No 6 (2020)
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COLPOSCOPY 2020 — COLPOSCOPY PROTOCOLS: A Summary of the Clinical Experts Consensus Guidelines of the Polish Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathophysiology and the Polish Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians

Robert Jach, Maciej Mazurec, Martyna Trzeszcz, Anna Bartosinska-Dyc, Barlomiej Galarowicz, Witold Kedzia, Andrzej Nowakowski, Kazimierz Pitynski
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2020.0075
·
Pubmed: 32627158
·
Ginekol Pol 2020;91(6):362371.

open access

Vol 91, No 6 (2020)
RECOMMENDATIONS
Published online: 2020-06-30

Abstract

The Polish Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathophysiology and the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians provide comprehensive guidelines for colposcopy practice in secondary cervical cancer prevention in Poland. This part of the guidelines, developed by the clinical experts of the Working Group No. 1 (WG1), concerns the colposcopy protocols with the main aim of algorithmizing the procedure, together with all procedure-related processes. The detailed analysis of strong scientific evidence and an extensive literature review of current international colposcopic recommendations were carried out, with also a broad investigation of recently ongoing dynamic changes in national health systems. The attention to colposcopic limitations also occurring in Polish conditions was kept. The overriding goal was the recommended obligatory minimal colposcopy approach introduction. To enhance the standard of colposcopy, adjustment of a precolposcopic assessment, a performance technique, types of used biopsies, as well as the procedure documentation was made. Elements of the risk-based stratification for the increased risk of developing cervical cancer was also included if it was applicable for that part of the guidelines. Comprehensive colposcopy guidelines are a step towards the ongoing era of a precision medicine in cervical cancer prevention in Poland.

Abstract

The Polish Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathophysiology and the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians provide comprehensive guidelines for colposcopy practice in secondary cervical cancer prevention in Poland. This part of the guidelines, developed by the clinical experts of the Working Group No. 1 (WG1), concerns the colposcopy protocols with the main aim of algorithmizing the procedure, together with all procedure-related processes. The detailed analysis of strong scientific evidence and an extensive literature review of current international colposcopic recommendations were carried out, with also a broad investigation of recently ongoing dynamic changes in national health systems. The attention to colposcopic limitations also occurring in Polish conditions was kept. The overriding goal was the recommended obligatory minimal colposcopy approach introduction. To enhance the standard of colposcopy, adjustment of a precolposcopic assessment, a performance technique, types of used biopsies, as well as the procedure documentation was made. Elements of the risk-based stratification for the increased risk of developing cervical cancer was also included if it was applicable for that part of the guidelines. Comprehensive colposcopy guidelines are a step towards the ongoing era of a precision medicine in cervical cancer prevention in Poland.

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Keywords

colposcopy; cervical biopsy; cervical cancer prevention; colposcopic practice; guidelines

About this article
Title

COLPOSCOPY 2020 — COLPOSCOPY PROTOCOLS: A Summary of the Clinical Experts Consensus Guidelines of the Polish Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathophysiology and the Polish Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 91, No 6 (2020)

Pages

362371

Published online

2020-06-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2020.0075

Pubmed

32627158

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2020;91(6):362371.

Keywords

colposcopy
cervical biopsy
cervical cancer prevention
colposcopic practice
guidelines

Authors

Robert Jach
Maciej Mazurec
Martyna Trzeszcz
Anna Bartosinska-Dyc
Barlomiej Galarowicz
Witold Kedzia
Andrzej Nowakowski
Kazimierz Pitynski

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