open access

Vol 91, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2020-01-31
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Adjuvant therapy for early endometrial cancer — who benefits the most from a radiation therapy?

Marcin Michalak, Zaneta Warenczak Florczak, Agnieszka Staszewska-Nowak, Andrzej Roszak
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2020.0003
·
Pubmed: 32039461
·
Ginekol Pol 2020;91(1):6-12.

open access

Vol 91, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2020-01-31

Abstract

Objectives: Since 1990s the number of patients diagnosed with endometrial cancer (EC) has doubled. The standard
treatment method for treating early endometrial cancer is surgery. Some patients require a subsequent adjuvant therapy.
In early endometrial cancers its application is limited to the populations with a high risk of recurrence.
The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of early endometrial cancer treatment based on an analysis of 5-year
follow up of EC patients.
Material and methods: The analysis consisted in a retrospective non-randomized interventional study of patients treated
for early endometrial cancer (FIGO stage IA, IB, II). Its end point was either local (small pelvis) or distant recurrence of the
disease. Intervention involved an adjuvant treatment applied in selected patients according to the current guidelines for
EC treatment. There was no randomization for adjuvant and non-adjuvant EC treatment. The study included a total of
419 patients treated for EC from 2010 to 2012.
Results: The analysis revealed that 108 patients (25.8%) were diagnosed with the recurrent disease. Out of 112 patients treated
for stage IA endometrial cancer 32 (28.6%) experienced recurrence. Out of 216 patients at FIGO Stage IB, recurrence was diagnosed
in 38 (17.6%). In the group of 91 patients treated for FIGO stage II, EC the recurrence was diagnosed in 38 (41.2%) cases.
Conclusions: Early EC treatment results were unsatisfactory and should be improved. The best outcomes were achieved
in patients with IA stage of EC who received a radiation therapy.

Abstract

Objectives: Since 1990s the number of patients diagnosed with endometrial cancer (EC) has doubled. The standard
treatment method for treating early endometrial cancer is surgery. Some patients require a subsequent adjuvant therapy.
In early endometrial cancers its application is limited to the populations with a high risk of recurrence.
The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of early endometrial cancer treatment based on an analysis of 5-year
follow up of EC patients.
Material and methods: The analysis consisted in a retrospective non-randomized interventional study of patients treated
for early endometrial cancer (FIGO stage IA, IB, II). Its end point was either local (small pelvis) or distant recurrence of the
disease. Intervention involved an adjuvant treatment applied in selected patients according to the current guidelines for
EC treatment. There was no randomization for adjuvant and non-adjuvant EC treatment. The study included a total of
419 patients treated for EC from 2010 to 2012.
Results: The analysis revealed that 108 patients (25.8%) were diagnosed with the recurrent disease. Out of 112 patients treated
for stage IA endometrial cancer 32 (28.6%) experienced recurrence. Out of 216 patients at FIGO Stage IB, recurrence was diagnosed
in 38 (17.6%). In the group of 91 patients treated for FIGO stage II, EC the recurrence was diagnosed in 38 (41.2%) cases.
Conclusions: Early EC treatment results were unsatisfactory and should be improved. The best outcomes were achieved
in patients with IA stage of EC who received a radiation therapy.

Get Citation

Keywords

early endometrial cancer; adjuvant therapy; Treatment Effectiveness Assessment

About this article
Title

Adjuvant therapy for early endometrial cancer — who benefits the most from a radiation therapy?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 91, No 1 (2020)

Pages

6-12

Published online

2020-01-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.2020.0003

Pubmed

32039461

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2020;91(1):6-12.

Keywords

early endometrial cancer
adjuvant therapy
Treatment Effectiveness Assessment

Authors

Marcin Michalak
Zaneta Warenczak Florczak
Agnieszka Staszewska-Nowak
Andrzej Roszak

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