open access

Vol 90, No 11 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-11-28
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Evaluation of catalase, myeloperoxidase and ferroxidase values in pregnant women with hyperemesis gravidarum

Serhat Ege, Muhammed Hanifi Bademkiran, Nurullah Peker, Selami Erdem, İhsan Bağli, Ruşen Köçeroğlu, Bekir Kahveci, Recep Yildizhan, Özcan Erel, Eşref Araç
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0110
·
Pubmed: 31802466
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(11):651-655.

open access

Vol 90, No 11 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-11-28

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate maternal serum catalase, myeloperoxidase and ferroxidase levels in pregnant women with Hyperemesis Gravidarum and to compare the results with healthy pregnancies. 

Material and methods: In this study, 60 female patients admitted to the Health Sciences University, Gazi Yaşargil Training and Research Hospital, Gynecology and Obstetrics Department were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 included 30 pregnant women with hyperemesis gravidarum; Group 2 included 30 healthy pregnant women. Pregnancies over 14 weeks were excluded from the study. 

Results: The laboratory and laboratory characteristics of both groups are shown in Table 1. No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of the maternal age, gestational age, gravidity, parity, fasting glucose level, and BMI. The maternal blood CAT levels were significantly higher in the HG group (219.6 ± 111.3 kU/L) when compared to the control group (71.5 ± 52.5 kU/L) (p < 0.001). The maternal blood MPO levels were lower in the control group (121.5 ± 36.3 U/L) than in the study group (90.9 ± 56.4 U/L) (p = 0.016). However, the ferroxidase levels were similar between the two groups. The independent variables BMI, age, parity, gravidity and gestational week effects were adjusted according to the logistic regression method with groups. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the levels of CAT (0.001), MPO (0.005) values. 

Conclusions: This study suggests that antioxidants in response to oxidative stress gave different reactions with different mechanisms; Also, we believe that insufficient food intake suppresses the immune system and this has an important role on antioxidants.

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate maternal serum catalase, myeloperoxidase and ferroxidase levels in pregnant women with Hyperemesis Gravidarum and to compare the results with healthy pregnancies. 

Material and methods: In this study, 60 female patients admitted to the Health Sciences University, Gazi Yaşargil Training and Research Hospital, Gynecology and Obstetrics Department were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 included 30 pregnant women with hyperemesis gravidarum; Group 2 included 30 healthy pregnant women. Pregnancies over 14 weeks were excluded from the study. 

Results: The laboratory and laboratory characteristics of both groups are shown in Table 1. No significant differences were found between the groups in terms of the maternal age, gestational age, gravidity, parity, fasting glucose level, and BMI. The maternal blood CAT levels were significantly higher in the HG group (219.6 ± 111.3 kU/L) when compared to the control group (71.5 ± 52.5 kU/L) (p < 0.001). The maternal blood MPO levels were lower in the control group (121.5 ± 36.3 U/L) than in the study group (90.9 ± 56.4 U/L) (p = 0.016). However, the ferroxidase levels were similar between the two groups. The independent variables BMI, age, parity, gravidity and gestational week effects were adjusted according to the logistic regression method with groups. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the levels of CAT (0.001), MPO (0.005) values. 

Conclusions: This study suggests that antioxidants in response to oxidative stress gave different reactions with different mechanisms; Also, we believe that insufficient food intake suppresses the immune system and this has an important role on antioxidants.

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Keywords

catalase; myeloperoxidase; ferroxidase; hyperemesis gravidarum

About this article
Title

Evaluation of catalase, myeloperoxidase and ferroxidase values in pregnant women with hyperemesis gravidarum

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 11 (2019)

Pages

651-655

Published online

2019-11-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0110

Pubmed

31802466

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(11):651-655.

Keywords

catalase
myeloperoxidase
ferroxidase
hyperemesis gravidarum

Authors

Serhat Ege
Muhammed Hanifi Bademkiran
Nurullah Peker
Selami Erdem
İhsan Bağli
Ruşen Köçeroğlu
Bekir Kahveci
Recep Yildizhan
Özcan Erel
Eşref Araç

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