open access

Vol 90, No 11 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-11-28
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Use of electrical impedance spectroscopy as an adjunct to colposcopy in a pathway of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia diagnostics

Wojciech Homola, Tomasz Fuchs, Pawel Baranski, Aleksandra Zimmer, Mariusz Zimmer, Michal Pomorski
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0107
·
Pubmed: 31802462
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(11):628-632.

open access

Vol 90, No 11 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-11-28

Abstract

Objectives: Screening with cytology decreases cervical cancer burden, but new methods have emerged. We assessed the diagnostic value of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the real-world gynecological setting. The study aimed to determine the diagnostic usefulness of EIS used as an adjunct to colposcopies in the diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in women with abnormal cytology findings.

Material and methods: A cross-sectional, single center, observational study considered 143 women. All were subjected to a colposcopy and EIS with ZedScan. ZedScan-guided or colposcopically-guided biopsies were carried out.

Results: Data from 118 women were analyzed. The average age of the included women was 38.29 } 12.52 years (range: 22–86 years). Overall, 27 had a diagnosis of CIN2+ and above on histopathological examination, 99 had low-grade colposcopy results, 18 had high-grade colposcopy results, and 80 had positive ZedScan examination. No adverse events related to the examination with ZedScan were observed. EIS used as an adjunct to colposcopies showed sensitivity of 96.30% (95% CI: 81.03–99.91) and specificity of 39.56% (95% CI: 29.46–50.36), and accuracy of 52.54% (95% CI: 43.15–61.81). The procedure allowed to detect 11 additional cases with positive histo-pathological result in comparison to colposcopies alone.

Conclusions: Colposcopies performed with ZedScan as an adjunct were effective in detecting high-grade cervical lesions. Advantages of ZedScan include real-time result display, no additional diagnostic burden posed on the patient, and good safety profile. Studies on large patient cohorts are needed for further evaluations of this diagnostic procedure and factors which may affect its diagnostic accuracy.

Abstract

Objectives: Screening with cytology decreases cervical cancer burden, but new methods have emerged. We assessed the diagnostic value of electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the real-world gynecological setting. The study aimed to determine the diagnostic usefulness of EIS used as an adjunct to colposcopies in the diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in women with abnormal cytology findings.

Material and methods: A cross-sectional, single center, observational study considered 143 women. All were subjected to a colposcopy and EIS with ZedScan. ZedScan-guided or colposcopically-guided biopsies were carried out.

Results: Data from 118 women were analyzed. The average age of the included women was 38.29 } 12.52 years (range: 22–86 years). Overall, 27 had a diagnosis of CIN2+ and above on histopathological examination, 99 had low-grade colposcopy results, 18 had high-grade colposcopy results, and 80 had positive ZedScan examination. No adverse events related to the examination with ZedScan were observed. EIS used as an adjunct to colposcopies showed sensitivity of 96.30% (95% CI: 81.03–99.91) and specificity of 39.56% (95% CI: 29.46–50.36), and accuracy of 52.54% (95% CI: 43.15–61.81). The procedure allowed to detect 11 additional cases with positive histo-pathological result in comparison to colposcopies alone.

Conclusions: Colposcopies performed with ZedScan as an adjunct were effective in detecting high-grade cervical lesions. Advantages of ZedScan include real-time result display, no additional diagnostic burden posed on the patient, and good safety profile. Studies on large patient cohorts are needed for further evaluations of this diagnostic procedure and factors which may affect its diagnostic accuracy.

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Keywords

electrical impedance spectroscopy; colposcopy; squamous intraepithelial lesions; sensitivity; specificity; predictive value

About this article
Title

Use of electrical impedance spectroscopy as an adjunct to colposcopy in a pathway of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia diagnostics

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 11 (2019)

Pages

628-632

Published online

2019-11-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0107

Pubmed

31802462

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(11):628-632.

Keywords

electrical impedance spectroscopy
colposcopy
squamous intraepithelial lesions
sensitivity
specificity
predictive value

Authors

Wojciech Homola
Tomasz Fuchs
Pawel Baranski
Aleksandra Zimmer
Mariusz Zimmer
Michal Pomorski

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