open access

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-10-31
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Early potential metabolic biomarkers of primary postpartum haemorrhage based on serum metabolomics

Tingting Chen, Yidong Zhang, Wenjun Yuan
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0105
·
Pubmed: 31686419
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(10):607-615.

open access

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-10-31

Abstract

Objectives: Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal death, accounting for 1/4 of maternal deaths worldwide. Determining sensitive biomarkers in the peripheral blood to identify postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is essential for the early diagnosis and management of PPH. The purpose of this study is to identify predictive serum metabolic biomarkers of PPH. Thirty healthy pregnant women and 30 cases of postpartum hemorrhage were studied for our research.

Material and methods: The serum metabolites of all pregnant were detected by liquid chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOFMS) and the corresponding biomarkers were identified.

Results: 34 significantly altered metabolites in PPH-pre-group were identified. They were mainly involved in fatty acid, and glycerophospholipid metabolism.

Conclusions: The LysoPCs, PCs, PGs, PIs were effective biomarkers for identifying PPH. The disturbed signaling pathways, mTOR signaling, acute phase response signaling, AMPK signaling and eNOS signaling pathways might be related to the etiopathogenesis of PPH. Our study provided a valuable attempt to screen early diagnostic markers of PPH and to further understand its pathogenesis.

Abstract

Objectives: Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal death, accounting for 1/4 of maternal deaths worldwide. Determining sensitive biomarkers in the peripheral blood to identify postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is essential for the early diagnosis and management of PPH. The purpose of this study is to identify predictive serum metabolic biomarkers of PPH. Thirty healthy pregnant women and 30 cases of postpartum hemorrhage were studied for our research.

Material and methods: The serum metabolites of all pregnant were detected by liquid chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOFMS) and the corresponding biomarkers were identified.

Results: 34 significantly altered metabolites in PPH-pre-group were identified. They were mainly involved in fatty acid, and glycerophospholipid metabolism.

Conclusions: The LysoPCs, PCs, PGs, PIs were effective biomarkers for identifying PPH. The disturbed signaling pathways, mTOR signaling, acute phase response signaling, AMPK signaling and eNOS signaling pathways might be related to the etiopathogenesis of PPH. Our study provided a valuable attempt to screen early diagnostic markers of PPH and to further understand its pathogenesis.

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Keywords

biomarker; metabolomics; primary postpartum haemorrhage

About this article
Title

Early potential metabolic biomarkers of primary postpartum haemorrhage based on serum metabolomics

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)

Pages

607-615

Published online

2019-10-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0105

Pubmed

31686419

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(10):607-615.

Keywords

biomarker
metabolomics
primary postpartum haemorrhage

Authors

Tingting Chen
Yidong Zhang
Wenjun Yuan

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