open access

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-10-31
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The role of nesfatin and selected molecular factors in various types of endometrial cancer

Anna Markowska, Monika Szarszewska, Pawel Knapp, Anna Grybos, Marian Grybos, Andrzej Marszalek, Violetta Filas, Katarzyna Wojcik-Krowiranda, Malgorzata Swornik, Janina Markowska
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0099
·
Pubmed: 31686413
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(10):571-576.

open access

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-10-31

Abstract

Objectives: Endometrial cancers (ECs) are the most common gynaecological cancers in well developed countries. Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are among the biggest risk factors. Nesfatin-1, the adipokine derivative of NUCB2 (nucleobindin derivative 2) is linked to the clinical course of EC. Molecular factors, including mutations in MLH1 and MHS2 genes, c-MET and ARID1A are also related to prognosis in endometrial cancer. Material and methods: Using sections of paraffin-embedded preparations and immunohistochemistry, the expression of NESF1, MLH1, MSH2,c-MET and ARID1A were examined. Results: In this study on protein expression, EC tissues manifested (although insignificantly) an elevated expression of NESF-1 in type II EC. In type I EC, NESF-1 expression was significantly higher in G1 in comparison to G2 and G3 together. A significantly lower expression of MLH1 was demonstrated in type I EC. Conclusions: The most pronounced expression involved c-MET in all EC I and EC II tissues (in over 80% of cases). A tendency was detected for a high expression of NESF-1 in patients with type II EC, who also exhibited a high expression of MSH2.

Abstract

Objectives: Endometrial cancers (ECs) are the most common gynaecological cancers in well developed countries. Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are among the biggest risk factors. Nesfatin-1, the adipokine derivative of NUCB2 (nucleobindin derivative 2) is linked to the clinical course of EC. Molecular factors, including mutations in MLH1 and MHS2 genes, c-MET and ARID1A are also related to prognosis in endometrial cancer. Material and methods: Using sections of paraffin-embedded preparations and immunohistochemistry, the expression of NESF1, MLH1, MSH2,c-MET and ARID1A were examined. Results: In this study on protein expression, EC tissues manifested (although insignificantly) an elevated expression of NESF-1 in type II EC. In type I EC, NESF-1 expression was significantly higher in G1 in comparison to G2 and G3 together. A significantly lower expression of MLH1 was demonstrated in type I EC. Conclusions: The most pronounced expression involved c-MET in all EC I and EC II tissues (in over 80% of cases). A tendency was detected for a high expression of NESF-1 in patients with type II EC, who also exhibited a high expression of MSH2.

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Keywords

endometrial cancer; NESF-1; MLH1; MSH2; c-MET; ARID1A

About this article
Title

The role of nesfatin and selected molecular factors in various types of endometrial cancer

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)

Pages

571-576

Published online

2019-10-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0099

Pubmed

31686413

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(10):571-576.

Keywords

endometrial cancer
NESF-1
MLH1
MSH2
c-MET
ARID1A

Authors

Anna Markowska
Monika Szarszewska
Pawel Knapp
Anna Grybos
Marian Grybos
Andrzej Marszalek
Violetta Filas
Katarzyna Wojcik-Krowiranda
Malgorzata Swornik
Janina Markowska

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