open access

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-10-31
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The parameters to estimate postoperative severe complications classified through Clavien-Dindo after upper abdominal surgery in patients with primary and recurrent ovarian cancer

Yakup Yalcin, Burak Tatar, Ebru Erdemoglu, Evrim Erdemoglu
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0097
·
Pubmed: 31686411
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(10):557-564.

open access

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-10-31

Abstract

Objectives: The more surgical effort and performing extensive upper abdominal surgery (UAS) are often required to accomplish the highest rates of optimally cytoreduction in patients with ovarian cancer. Nonetheless, the rate of complications increases with extensive surgery. We have studied the upper abdominal surgery complications by Clavien-Dindo Classification (CDC) and analyzed parameters affecting post-operative severe complications classified through Clavien-Dindo.

Material and methods: A retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer from January 1st 2009 to April 30th 2016 was evaluated. Patients who underwent at least one UAS procedure with or without optimal cytoreduction for epithelial ovarian cancer (stage IIIC–IV or recurrent) were included. Postoperative complications were recorded according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification.

Results: In total, 58 patients were included. There were 120 UAS procedures performed on the 58 patients. Diaphragm peritonectomy was the most performed surgery (50%, 29/58), and then the other UAS procedures were liver surgery (39.7%, 23/58), cholecystectomy (24.1%, 14/58), splenic surgery (24.1%, 14/58), full-thickness diaphragm resection (22.4%, 13/58), pancreatic surgery (19%, 11/58), resection of tumor from porta hepatis (17.2%, 10/58), celiac lymph node excision (8.6%, 5/58), partial gastrectomy (1.7%, 1/58), respectively. Thirteen patients (22.4%) had post-operative grade 3–5 complications according to CDC within 30 days after surgery.

Conclusions: This current study demonstrated that the addition of extensive upper abdominal surgery procedures were not associated with increased postoperative severe complications in patients with recurrent or advanced ovarian cancer. These procedures are safe and feasible for patients in need and also can be performed with acceptable mortality and morbidity.

Abstract

Objectives: The more surgical effort and performing extensive upper abdominal surgery (UAS) are often required to accomplish the highest rates of optimally cytoreduction in patients with ovarian cancer. Nonetheless, the rate of complications increases with extensive surgery. We have studied the upper abdominal surgery complications by Clavien-Dindo Classification (CDC) and analyzed parameters affecting post-operative severe complications classified through Clavien-Dindo.

Material and methods: A retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer from January 1st 2009 to April 30th 2016 was evaluated. Patients who underwent at least one UAS procedure with or without optimal cytoreduction for epithelial ovarian cancer (stage IIIC–IV or recurrent) were included. Postoperative complications were recorded according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification.

Results: In total, 58 patients were included. There were 120 UAS procedures performed on the 58 patients. Diaphragm peritonectomy was the most performed surgery (50%, 29/58), and then the other UAS procedures were liver surgery (39.7%, 23/58), cholecystectomy (24.1%, 14/58), splenic surgery (24.1%, 14/58), full-thickness diaphragm resection (22.4%, 13/58), pancreatic surgery (19%, 11/58), resection of tumor from porta hepatis (17.2%, 10/58), celiac lymph node excision (8.6%, 5/58), partial gastrectomy (1.7%, 1/58), respectively. Thirteen patients (22.4%) had post-operative grade 3–5 complications according to CDC within 30 days after surgery.

Conclusions: This current study demonstrated that the addition of extensive upper abdominal surgery procedures were not associated with increased postoperative severe complications in patients with recurrent or advanced ovarian cancer. These procedures are safe and feasible for patients in need and also can be performed with acceptable mortality and morbidity.

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Keywords

upper abdominal surgery; Clavien-Dindo; ovarian cancer; postoperative complication

About this article
Title

The parameters to estimate postoperative severe complications classified through Clavien-Dindo after upper abdominal surgery in patients with primary and recurrent ovarian cancer

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 10 (2019)

Pages

557-564

Published online

2019-10-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0097

Pubmed

31686411

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(10):557-564.

Keywords

upper abdominal surgery
Clavien-Dindo
ovarian cancer
postoperative complication

Authors

Yakup Yalcin
Burak Tatar
Ebru Erdemoglu
Evrim Erdemoglu

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