open access

Vol 90, No 9 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-09-30
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Stress urinary incontinence after labor and satisfaction with sex life

Grazyna Stadnicka, Anna Stodolak, Anna B. Pilewska-Kozak
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0087
·
Pubmed: 31588546
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(9):500-506.

open access

Vol 90, No 9 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-09-30

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the incidence of stress urinary incontinence in women after labor, its determinants, and to establish its effect on women’s satisfaction with their sex lives. 

Material and methods: The research implemented the Gaudenz-Incontinence-Questionnaire and the Sexual Quality of Life-Female scale (SQoL-F). The principal inclusion criterion was the time of 3 to 6 months after labor. 

Results: The research was carried out amongst 193 women. Thirty-two of the participants (16.6%) showed symptoms of stress urinary incontinence after labor that were statistically correlated with the number of experienced labors (p = 0.044) and the newborn’s weight (p = 0.016). The participants’ sex life satisfaction was on average 75.47 ± 24.68. The respondents suffering from stress urinary incontinence obtained a significantly lower (p = 0.006) average score for general sex life satisfaction (64.38 ± 26.15) when compared with women without symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (77.67 ± 23.86). 

Conclusions: The problem of incontinence after labor affected one in six women. Occupation, number of pregnancies, damage to the perineum during labor, and the infant’s birth weight significantly dependent on the incontinence occurrence after labor. The onset of incontinence symptoms in women in the reproductive age has an adverse effect on their sex life satisfaction.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the incidence of stress urinary incontinence in women after labor, its determinants, and to establish its effect on women’s satisfaction with their sex lives. 

Material and methods: The research implemented the Gaudenz-Incontinence-Questionnaire and the Sexual Quality of Life-Female scale (SQoL-F). The principal inclusion criterion was the time of 3 to 6 months after labor. 

Results: The research was carried out amongst 193 women. Thirty-two of the participants (16.6%) showed symptoms of stress urinary incontinence after labor that were statistically correlated with the number of experienced labors (p = 0.044) and the newborn’s weight (p = 0.016). The participants’ sex life satisfaction was on average 75.47 ± 24.68. The respondents suffering from stress urinary incontinence obtained a significantly lower (p = 0.006) average score for general sex life satisfaction (64.38 ± 26.15) when compared with women without symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (77.67 ± 23.86). 

Conclusions: The problem of incontinence after labor affected one in six women. Occupation, number of pregnancies, damage to the perineum during labor, and the infant’s birth weight significantly dependent on the incontinence occurrence after labor. The onset of incontinence symptoms in women in the reproductive age has an adverse effect on their sex life satisfaction.

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Keywords

parturition; stress urinary incontinence; sexuality

About this article
Title

Stress urinary incontinence after labor and satisfaction with sex life

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 9 (2019)

Pages

500-506

Published online

2019-09-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0087

Pubmed

31588546

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(9):500-506.

Keywords

parturition
stress urinary incontinence
sexuality

Authors

Grazyna Stadnicka
Anna Stodolak
Anna B. Pilewska-Kozak

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