open access

Vol 90, No 8 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-08-30
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Evaluation of occult uterine leiomyosarcomas

Emrah Beyan, Ahkam Göksel Kanmaz, Abdurrahman Hamdi İnan, Volkan Karataşlı, Sadettin Oğuzhan Tutar, Murat Alan, Emrah Töz, Muzaffer Sancı
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0075
·
Pubmed: 31482545
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(8):433-437.

open access

Vol 90, No 8 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-08-30

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the frequency of occult uterine leiomyosarcomas following hysterectomies and myomectomies performed for benign reasons at our clinic and to draw comparisons with similar studies in the literature. 

Material and methods: All hysterectomies and myomectomies that have been performed for benign reasons at our clinic between 2010 and 2017 were retrospectively examined via the hospital’s information system and the patients that were found to have leiomyosarcomas were analysed. The incidence of occult uterine leiomyosarcoma per 1000 surgeries at our clinic was calculated using the Wilson score interval. 

Results: A total of 6,173 hysterectomies were performed, and occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was identified in 5 patients. The incidence of occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was calculated to be 0.08% (95% CI 0.03–0.018%). Only 1 of the 771 patients who underwent myomectomy was identified with occult uterine leiomyosarcoma, making its incidence in myomectomy 0.12% (95% CI 0.02–0.073%). When all the patients are considered, occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was identified in 6 of the 6,944 patients, and the general incidence of occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was calculated as 0.08% (95% CI 0.03–0.018%). 

Conclusions: In our study, the incidence of occult uterine sarcoma following myomectomy and hysterectomy was found to be lower than that reported in the literature. The reason for this lower incidence includes not only genetic causes and racial differences but also preoperative imaging, endometrial and cervical sampling that is performed on every patient.

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the frequency of occult uterine leiomyosarcomas following hysterectomies and myomectomies performed for benign reasons at our clinic and to draw comparisons with similar studies in the literature. 

Material and methods: All hysterectomies and myomectomies that have been performed for benign reasons at our clinic between 2010 and 2017 were retrospectively examined via the hospital’s information system and the patients that were found to have leiomyosarcomas were analysed. The incidence of occult uterine leiomyosarcoma per 1000 surgeries at our clinic was calculated using the Wilson score interval. 

Results: A total of 6,173 hysterectomies were performed, and occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was identified in 5 patients. The incidence of occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was calculated to be 0.08% (95% CI 0.03–0.018%). Only 1 of the 771 patients who underwent myomectomy was identified with occult uterine leiomyosarcoma, making its incidence in myomectomy 0.12% (95% CI 0.02–0.073%). When all the patients are considered, occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was identified in 6 of the 6,944 patients, and the general incidence of occult uterine leiomyosarcoma was calculated as 0.08% (95% CI 0.03–0.018%). 

Conclusions: In our study, the incidence of occult uterine sarcoma following myomectomy and hysterectomy was found to be lower than that reported in the literature. The reason for this lower incidence includes not only genetic causes and racial differences but also preoperative imaging, endometrial and cervical sampling that is performed on every patient.

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Keywords

leiomyosarcoma; hysterectomy; myomectomy; myoma

About this article
Title

Evaluation of occult uterine leiomyosarcomas

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 8 (2019)

Pages

433-437

Published online

2019-08-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0075

Pubmed

31482545

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(8):433-437.

Keywords

leiomyosarcoma
hysterectomy
myomectomy
myoma

Authors

Emrah Beyan
Ahkam Göksel Kanmaz
Abdurrahman Hamdi İnan
Volkan Karataşlı
Sadettin Oğuzhan Tutar
Murat Alan
Emrah Töz
Muzaffer Sancı

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