open access

Vol 90, No 7 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-07-26
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Maternal factors, ultrasound and placental function parameters in early pregnancy as predictors of birth weight in low-risk populations and among patients with pre-gestational diabetes

Anna Gasiorowska, Agnieszka Zawiejska, Piotr Dydowicz, Ewa Wender-Ozegowska, Grzegorz Poprawski, Kinga Tobola-Wrobel, Katarzyna Ziolkowska, Marek Pietryga
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0067
·
Pubmed: 31392708
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(7):388-395.

open access

Vol 90, No 7 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-07-26

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of our work was to assess the usefulness of maternal factors, ultrasound and placental function parameters during early pregnancy as predictors of birth weight in populations of healthy pregnant women and women suffering from pregestational diabetes.

Material and methods: A study group comprised 97 healthy women and 160 women with pregestational diabetes (PGDM, type 1), all in singleton pregnancy. Ultrasound examination was performed between weeks 11 and 14, and in weeks 20 and 30 of gestation, based on recommendations of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians, Ultrasonography Division. We also checked uterine artery blood flow parameters. During the first trimester consultation, all patients were surveyed and the following data were collected: age, BMI, reproductive history, comorbidities and smoking. We also collected blood samples and assessed PlGF, PAPP-A, and BhCG levels.

Results: Our study showed that newborn birth weight negatively correlated with mother’s age, her diastolic blood pressure, PI of her uterine arteries and BhCG protein levels. Moreover, birth weight directly correlated with PlGF and PAPPA-A protein levels, and maternal early-pregnancy BMI.

Conclusions: LGA diagnosis in the first trimester of pregnancy allows for selection and modification of some risk factors and closer monitoring of endangered fetuses throughout the pregnancy, with emphasis on the perinatal period. Parameters with confirmed usefulness in the prediction of birth weight in the first trimester included: maternal age, BMI, blood pressure, PAPP-A, BhCG and PlGF levels, fetal CRL and uterine artery PI.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of our work was to assess the usefulness of maternal factors, ultrasound and placental function parameters during early pregnancy as predictors of birth weight in populations of healthy pregnant women and women suffering from pregestational diabetes.

Material and methods: A study group comprised 97 healthy women and 160 women with pregestational diabetes (PGDM, type 1), all in singleton pregnancy. Ultrasound examination was performed between weeks 11 and 14, and in weeks 20 and 30 of gestation, based on recommendations of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians, Ultrasonography Division. We also checked uterine artery blood flow parameters. During the first trimester consultation, all patients were surveyed and the following data were collected: age, BMI, reproductive history, comorbidities and smoking. We also collected blood samples and assessed PlGF, PAPP-A, and BhCG levels.

Results: Our study showed that newborn birth weight negatively correlated with mother’s age, her diastolic blood pressure, PI of her uterine arteries and BhCG protein levels. Moreover, birth weight directly correlated with PlGF and PAPPA-A protein levels, and maternal early-pregnancy BMI.

Conclusions: LGA diagnosis in the first trimester of pregnancy allows for selection and modification of some risk factors and closer monitoring of endangered fetuses throughout the pregnancy, with emphasis on the perinatal period. Parameters with confirmed usefulness in the prediction of birth weight in the first trimester included: maternal age, BMI, blood pressure, PAPP-A, BhCG and PlGF levels, fetal CRL and uterine artery PI.

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Keywords

birth weight; pre-existing diabetes; macrosomia; LGA; SGA

About this article
Title

Maternal factors, ultrasound and placental function parameters in early pregnancy as predictors of birth weight in low-risk populations and among patients with pre-gestational diabetes

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 7 (2019)

Pages

388-395

Published online

2019-07-26

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0067

Pubmed

31392708

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(7):388-395.

Keywords

birth weight
pre-existing diabetes
macrosomia
LGA
SGA

Authors

Anna Gasiorowska
Agnieszka Zawiejska
Piotr Dydowicz
Ewa Wender-Ozegowska
Grzegorz Poprawski
Kinga Tobola-Wrobel
Katarzyna Ziolkowska
Marek Pietryga

References (16)
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