open access

Vol 90, No 7 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-07-26
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Circulating sclerostin levels in relation to nutritional status, sex hormones and selected bone turnover biochemical markers levels in peri- and postmenopausal women

Mariola Czajkowska, Ryszard Plinta, Aleksander Owczarek, Magdalena Olszanecka-Glinianowicz, Violetta Skrzypulec-Plinta
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0064
·
Pubmed: 31392705
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(7):371-375.

open access

Vol 90, No 7 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-07-26

Abstract

Objectives: Hormonal changes during the peri- and postmenopausal age, especially decreasing estradiol levels as the result of the expired ovarian function, are an established link of the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of the study was to examine the association between the circulating sclerostin levels and nutritional status, sex hormones and selected bone markers turnover levels in peri- and postmenopausal women.

Material and methods: The study enrolled 84 stable-body mass women (31 perimenopausal and 54 postmenopausal). Anthropometric measurements and serum estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, DHEA-S, osteocalcin, β-CTx, 25-OHVitamin D and sclerostin levels were obtained.

Results: There were not any differences between body mass, BMI, body fat and waist circumference between the study groups. The serum androstenedione and DHEA-S levels were similar in both study groups. However, estrone and total testosterone levels were observed to be notably higher in the perimenopausal group, unlike in the postmenopausal group (124.1 pg/mL vs. 98.3 pg/mL, p < 0.01 and 0.3 pg/mL vs. 0.22 pg/mL, p < 0.01, respectively). Higher plasma osteocalcin and β-CTx levels were shown in the postmenopausal rather than in the perimenopausal group (19.8 ng/mL vs. 16.8 ng/mL, p < 0.001 and 0.35 ng/mL vs. 0.29 ng/mL, p < 0.05, respectively). Plasma sclerostin and 25-OH-Vitamin D levels were similar. There was not any correlation between plasma sclerostin levels and the other studied parameters. In the multivariate regression analyses, sclerostin levels were proportional to the androstenedione ones (b = 0.06; p < 0.05) but inversely related to the log10(testosterone) levels (b = -0.18; p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Circulating sclerostin levels are similar in peri- and postmenopausal women and are related to the androstenedione and testosterone levels regardless of the nutritional status.

Abstract

Objectives: Hormonal changes during the peri- and postmenopausal age, especially decreasing estradiol levels as the result of the expired ovarian function, are an established link of the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The objective of the study was to examine the association between the circulating sclerostin levels and nutritional status, sex hormones and selected bone markers turnover levels in peri- and postmenopausal women.

Material and methods: The study enrolled 84 stable-body mass women (31 perimenopausal and 54 postmenopausal). Anthropometric measurements and serum estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, DHEA-S, osteocalcin, β-CTx, 25-OHVitamin D and sclerostin levels were obtained.

Results: There were not any differences between body mass, BMI, body fat and waist circumference between the study groups. The serum androstenedione and DHEA-S levels were similar in both study groups. However, estrone and total testosterone levels were observed to be notably higher in the perimenopausal group, unlike in the postmenopausal group (124.1 pg/mL vs. 98.3 pg/mL, p < 0.01 and 0.3 pg/mL vs. 0.22 pg/mL, p < 0.01, respectively). Higher plasma osteocalcin and β-CTx levels were shown in the postmenopausal rather than in the perimenopausal group (19.8 ng/mL vs. 16.8 ng/mL, p < 0.001 and 0.35 ng/mL vs. 0.29 ng/mL, p < 0.05, respectively). Plasma sclerostin and 25-OH-Vitamin D levels were similar. There was not any correlation between plasma sclerostin levels and the other studied parameters. In the multivariate regression analyses, sclerostin levels were proportional to the androstenedione ones (b = 0.06; p < 0.05) but inversely related to the log10(testosterone) levels (b = -0.18; p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Circulating sclerostin levels are similar in peri- and postmenopausal women and are related to the androstenedione and testosterone levels regardless of the nutritional status.

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Keywords

sclerostin; bone turnover markers; sex hormones; nutritional status; menopause

About this article
Title

Circulating sclerostin levels in relation to nutritional status, sex hormones and selected bone turnover biochemical markers levels in peri- and postmenopausal women

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 7 (2019)

Pages

371-375

Published online

2019-07-26

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0064

Pubmed

31392705

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(7):371-375.

Keywords

sclerostin
bone turnover markers
sex hormones
nutritional status
menopause

Authors

Mariola Czajkowska
Ryszard Plinta
Aleksander Owczarek
Magdalena Olszanecka-Glinianowicz
Violetta Skrzypulec-Plinta

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