open access

Vol 90, No 6 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-06-28
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New therapeutic approaches in the treatment of node-positive cervical cancer patients based on molecular targets: a systematic review

Marcin Sniadecki, Anna Swierzko, Mateusz Dabkowski, Marzenna Orlowska-Volk, Ewa Wycinka, Dagmara Klasa-Mazurkiewicz, Agnieszka Milewska, Patryk Poniewierza, Marcin Liro, Dariusz Wydra
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0062
·
Pubmed: 31276186
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(6):336-345.

open access

Vol 90, No 6 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-06-28

Abstract

Cervical uterine cancer is the second most frequent female cancer worldwide and a substantial burden for low-income societies and the patients themselves. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of metastasis permits the development of therapies that limit tumor progression, as well as providing health and social benefits. Pathomorphology is still the basis of research and a reference standard for molecular analysis. The aim of our study was to research and critically evaluate clinical trials that use new oncological approaches for node-positive cervical cancer to gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of tumor metastasis. Inclusion criteria: node-positive disease at baseline; at least a first phase clinical study comprising adult female patients; novel clinical approach (e.g., radiotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, vaccines, radiosurgery); histologic measurement of treatment efficacy (preferably lymph node ultrastaging); and publications in English language only. Information sources: US Clinical trials registry, EU Clinical trials register, ISRCTN registry, and Ovid, EBSCO and Cochrane Collaboration databases. Access dates: from January 2010 to April 2018. Exclusions: Abstracts that did not meet the inclusion criteria or with unreliable data. We collected complete data (e.g., the entire publication associated with included abstracts, heterogeneity examination of individual studies, and validity measurement of the statistical methods used). Results were analyzed in relation to the most recent understanding of the pathogenesis of cervical cancer metastasis. We proposed a possible direction for drug treatment of epithelial tumors based on the mechanisms of metastasis.

Abstract

Cervical uterine cancer is the second most frequent female cancer worldwide and a substantial burden for low-income societies and the patients themselves. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of metastasis permits the development of therapies that limit tumor progression, as well as providing health and social benefits. Pathomorphology is still the basis of research and a reference standard for molecular analysis. The aim of our study was to research and critically evaluate clinical trials that use new oncological approaches for node-positive cervical cancer to gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of tumor metastasis. Inclusion criteria: node-positive disease at baseline; at least a first phase clinical study comprising adult female patients; novel clinical approach (e.g., radiotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, vaccines, radiosurgery); histologic measurement of treatment efficacy (preferably lymph node ultrastaging); and publications in English language only. Information sources: US Clinical trials registry, EU Clinical trials register, ISRCTN registry, and Ovid, EBSCO and Cochrane Collaboration databases. Access dates: from January 2010 to April 2018. Exclusions: Abstracts that did not meet the inclusion criteria or with unreliable data. We collected complete data (e.g., the entire publication associated with included abstracts, heterogeneity examination of individual studies, and validity measurement of the statistical methods used). Results were analyzed in relation to the most recent understanding of the pathogenesis of cervical cancer metastasis. We proposed a possible direction for drug treatment of epithelial tumors based on the mechanisms of metastasis.

Get Citation

Keywords

cervical cancer; lymph node; metastasis; trial; treatment; molecular; review

About this article
Title

New therapeutic approaches in the treatment of node-positive cervical cancer patients based on molecular targets: a systematic review

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 6 (2019)

Pages

336-345

Published online

2019-06-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0062

Pubmed

31276186

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(6):336-345.

Keywords

cervical cancer
lymph node
metastasis
trial
treatment
molecular
review

Authors

Marcin Sniadecki
Anna Swierzko
Mateusz Dabkowski
Marzenna Orlowska-Volk
Ewa Wycinka
Dagmara Klasa-Mazurkiewicz
Agnieszka Milewska
Patryk Poniewierza
Marcin Liro
Dariusz Wydra

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