open access

Vol 90, No 6 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-06-28
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Skin markers and the prediction of intraabdominal adhesion during second Cesarean delivery

Zainab Abdul Ameer Jaafar, Reshed Zeki Obeid, Dina Akeel Salman
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0059
·
Pubmed: 31276184
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(6):325-330.

open access

Vol 90, No 6 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-06-28

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the present study has been to examine skin scar characteristics and striae gravidarum, considering the reliability of each for predicting adhesions in repeat Caesarean sections. 

Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was done over a period of two years. One hundred pregnant women were invited to participate in the study. Preoperatively, abdominal scar features (according to the scar’s appearance) and stria gravidarum were both recorded.Then, at the time of surgery, intraabdominal adhesions were graded according to the modified Nair’s classification. 

Results: Among the skin markers, abdominal scar width (p = 0.001), depressed scar (p = 0.002) and striae colour grading (p = 0.0183) were found to have significant associations with intraabdominal adhesions; yet all were of low validity. 

Conclusions: Despite growing interest in the use of skin markers in the prediction of intraabdominal adhesions at the time of repeat CS, the present study demonstrates that these markers may not be reliable. 

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the present study has been to examine skin scar characteristics and striae gravidarum, considering the reliability of each for predicting adhesions in repeat Caesarean sections. 

Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was done over a period of two years. One hundred pregnant women were invited to participate in the study. Preoperatively, abdominal scar features (according to the scar’s appearance) and stria gravidarum were both recorded.Then, at the time of surgery, intraabdominal adhesions were graded according to the modified Nair’s classification. 

Results: Among the skin markers, abdominal scar width (p = 0.001), depressed scar (p = 0.002) and striae colour grading (p = 0.0183) were found to have significant associations with intraabdominal adhesions; yet all were of low validity. 

Conclusions: Despite growing interest in the use of skin markers in the prediction of intraabdominal adhesions at the time of repeat CS, the present study demonstrates that these markers may not be reliable. 

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Keywords

adhesions; caesarean section; abdominal scarf; striae gravidarum

About this article
Title

Skin markers and the prediction of intraabdominal adhesion during second Cesarean delivery

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 6 (2019)

Pages

325-330

Published online

2019-06-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0059

Pubmed

31276184

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(6):325-330.

Keywords

adhesions
caesarean section
abdominal scarf
striae gravidarum

Authors

Zainab Abdul Ameer Jaafar
Reshed Zeki Obeid
Dina Akeel Salman

References (24)
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