open access

Vol 90, No 5 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-05-31
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The relationship between body mass index, body composition and premenstrual syndrome prevalence in girls

Malgorzata Mizgier, Grazyna Jarzabek-Bielecka, Ewa Jakubek, Witold Kedzia
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0048
·
Pubmed: 31165464
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(5):256-261.

open access

Vol 90, No 5 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-05-31

Abstract

Objectives: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) is a cluster of physical and emotional symptoms occurring in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The study aim was to determine the relationship between PMS, and state of nutrition expressed as Body Mass Index (BMI) and body composition in 18-year-old females. 

Material and methods: The study was conducted on 476 women divided into two groups i.e. those suffering from PMS (n = 233) and those without symptoms (n = 243). The women were examined during their luteal phase using bioelectrical impedance analysis to determine their body composition. Height and weight were measured using digital medical scales with an electronic height rod. BMI was calculated thus: BMI = body mass (weight) (kg)/height (m2). The subjects were di- vided into two sub-groups: BMI < 25 kg/m2 and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Statistical analysis was carried out using STATISTICA 10 PL software and the Mann-Whitney test. 

Results: The women with normal BMI suffered from PMS twice as often as the women with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (68.2% vs. 31.8%). There were significantly higher values for Fat Mass (FM) (%) (p < 0.01) and FM (kg) (p < 0.001) in women without PMS, and significantly higher values for Fat-Free Mass (FFM) (%) (p < 0.001) and Total Body Water (TBW) (%) (p < 0.001) in women with PMS. Higher values were reported for FFM (kg) and TBW (kg) (p < 0.05) in girls with PMS and BMI ≥ 25.

Conclusions: These results show PMS is more frequent in patients with BMI < 25, and less frequent in patients with higher FM (kg) and FM (%). Moreover, significant frequency of PMS was observed in patients with higher FFM and TBW. Such statistical significance was not confirmed in girls with a BMI < 25. 

Abstract

Objectives: Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) is a cluster of physical and emotional symptoms occurring in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The study aim was to determine the relationship between PMS, and state of nutrition expressed as Body Mass Index (BMI) and body composition in 18-year-old females. 

Material and methods: The study was conducted on 476 women divided into two groups i.e. those suffering from PMS (n = 233) and those without symptoms (n = 243). The women were examined during their luteal phase using bioelectrical impedance analysis to determine their body composition. Height and weight were measured using digital medical scales with an electronic height rod. BMI was calculated thus: BMI = body mass (weight) (kg)/height (m2). The subjects were di- vided into two sub-groups: BMI < 25 kg/m2 and BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Statistical analysis was carried out using STATISTICA 10 PL software and the Mann-Whitney test. 

Results: The women with normal BMI suffered from PMS twice as often as the women with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (68.2% vs. 31.8%). There were significantly higher values for Fat Mass (FM) (%) (p < 0.01) and FM (kg) (p < 0.001) in women without PMS, and significantly higher values for Fat-Free Mass (FFM) (%) (p < 0.001) and Total Body Water (TBW) (%) (p < 0.001) in women with PMS. Higher values were reported for FFM (kg) and TBW (kg) (p < 0.05) in girls with PMS and BMI ≥ 25.

Conclusions: These results show PMS is more frequent in patients with BMI < 25, and less frequent in patients with higher FM (kg) and FM (%). Moreover, significant frequency of PMS was observed in patients with higher FFM and TBW. Such statistical significance was not confirmed in girls with a BMI < 25. 

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Keywords

premenstrual syndrome; gynaecology; body composition

About this article
Title

The relationship between body mass index, body composition and premenstrual syndrome prevalence in girls

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 5 (2019)

Pages

256-261

Published online

2019-05-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0048

Pubmed

31165464

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(5):256-261.

Keywords

premenstrual syndrome
gynaecology
body composition

Authors

Malgorzata Mizgier
Grazyna Jarzabek-Bielecka
Ewa Jakubek
Witold Kedzia

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