open access

Vol 90, No 4 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-04-29
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The early years of life. Are they influenced by our microbiome?

Adam Jagodzinski, Ewa Zielinska, Lukasz Laczmanski, Lidia Hirnle
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0041
·
Pubmed: 31059117
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(4):228-232.

open access

Vol 90, No 4 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-04-29

Abstract

Human microbiome contains the genetic pool of bacteria and other microbes such as Achaea, fungi and viruses inhabiting the human body. It holds an immense potential to affect both physiological and pathological processes. The microbiome’s composition can be defined in detail by analyzing ribosomal 16S rRNA and metagenomic tests. Recent increases in cesar- ean sections, the use of antibiotics during pregnancy, the increasing amount of prematurely born children and changes in infant nutrition have an impact on the microbiome forming process. A correlation between the bowel microbiome’s com- position and the occurrence of certain diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), asthma and type 1 diabetes has been demonstrated. The influence on the development of cognitive functions and behaviour has also been displayed. This correlation justifies attempts to restore the beneficial the composition of the microbiome through the use of probiotics, vaginal microflora transfer in case of cesarean section and encouraging breastfeeding. Development of multiple studies on the topic of the human microbiome and its impact on the human body is necessary in order to reach final conclusions. The aim of this article is to summarize recent findings regarding the development of the human microbiome from the first days of life and the influence of changes in its composition on human health.

Abstract

Human microbiome contains the genetic pool of bacteria and other microbes such as Achaea, fungi and viruses inhabiting the human body. It holds an immense potential to affect both physiological and pathological processes. The microbiome’s composition can be defined in detail by analyzing ribosomal 16S rRNA and metagenomic tests. Recent increases in cesar- ean sections, the use of antibiotics during pregnancy, the increasing amount of prematurely born children and changes in infant nutrition have an impact on the microbiome forming process. A correlation between the bowel microbiome’s com- position and the occurrence of certain diseases, especially inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), asthma and type 1 diabetes has been demonstrated. The influence on the development of cognitive functions and behaviour has also been displayed. This correlation justifies attempts to restore the beneficial the composition of the microbiome through the use of probiotics, vaginal microflora transfer in case of cesarean section and encouraging breastfeeding. Development of multiple studies on the topic of the human microbiome and its impact on the human body is necessary in order to reach final conclusions. The aim of this article is to summarize recent findings regarding the development of the human microbiome from the first days of life and the influence of changes in its composition on human health.

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Keywords

microbiome; newborn; delivery; diet; neurodevelopment; atopy; type 1 diabetes

About this article
Title

The early years of life. Are they influenced by our microbiome?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 4 (2019)

Pages

228-232

Published online

2019-04-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0041

Pubmed

31059117

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(4):228-232.

Keywords

microbiome
newborn
delivery
diet
neurodevelopment
atopy
type 1 diabetes

Authors

Adam Jagodzinski
Ewa Zielinska
Lukasz Laczmanski
Lidia Hirnle

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