open access

Vol 90, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-04-29
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Predictors of adverse perinatal outcomes in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

Samettin Çelik, Canan S. Çalışkan, Handan Çelik, Mehmet Güçlü, Alper Başbuğ
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0039
·
Pubmed: 31059115
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(4):217-222.

open access

Vol 90, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-04-29

Abstract

Objectives: Our objective was to evaluate in our clinic the perinatal outcomes of patients diagnosed with ICP based on pre-treatment maternal serum bile acid levels, attempt to identify the risk group and review the literature in light of this information. 

Material and methods: In total, 370 patients diagnosed with ICP were included in the study, divided into two groups based on the fasting total serum bile acid level before UDCA (Group 1: 10 ≥ 40 μmol/L, and Group 2: ≥ 40 μmol/L). The groups were examined for clinical characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. 

Results: It was found that preterm delivery and neonatal intensive care need increased at a serum bile acid cut-off value of 34 μmol/L. Regardless of serum bile acid, significantly higher rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid and foetal distress were observed in patients whose diagnoses were made before 34 weeks of gestation. 

Conclusions: Foetal complications over 40 μmol/L of serum bile acid were significantly increased. However, slightly lower levels cut-off values (34 μmol/L) were obtained in terms of preterm birth and neonatal intensive care need. The incidence of meconium-stained amniotic fluid and foetal distress was higher in patients whose diagnosis were made before 34 weeks of gestation. 

Abstract

Objectives: Our objective was to evaluate in our clinic the perinatal outcomes of patients diagnosed with ICP based on pre-treatment maternal serum bile acid levels, attempt to identify the risk group and review the literature in light of this information. 

Material and methods: In total, 370 patients diagnosed with ICP were included in the study, divided into two groups based on the fasting total serum bile acid level before UDCA (Group 1: 10 ≥ 40 μmol/L, and Group 2: ≥ 40 μmol/L). The groups were examined for clinical characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. 

Results: It was found that preterm delivery and neonatal intensive care need increased at a serum bile acid cut-off value of 34 μmol/L. Regardless of serum bile acid, significantly higher rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid and foetal distress were observed in patients whose diagnoses were made before 34 weeks of gestation. 

Conclusions: Foetal complications over 40 μmol/L of serum bile acid were significantly increased. However, slightly lower levels cut-off values (34 μmol/L) were obtained in terms of preterm birth and neonatal intensive care need. The incidence of meconium-stained amniotic fluid and foetal distress was higher in patients whose diagnosis were made before 34 weeks of gestation. 

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Keywords

intrahepatic cholestasis; pregnancy; perinatal complications

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About this article
Title

Predictors of adverse perinatal outcomes in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 4 (2019)

Pages

217-222

Published online

2019-04-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0039

Pubmed

31059115

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(4):217-222.

Keywords

intrahepatic cholestasis
pregnancy
perinatal complications

Authors

Samettin Çelik
Canan S. Çalışkan
Handan Çelik
Mehmet Güçlü
Alper Başbuğ

References (20)
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