open access

Vol 90, No 3 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-03-29
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The role of disordered angiogenesis tissue markers (sflt-1, Plgf) in present day diagnosis of preeclampsia

Sebastian Kwiatkowski, Ewa Kwiatkowska, Andrzej Torbe
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0030
·
Pubmed: 30950008
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(3):173-176.

open access

Vol 90, No 3 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-03-29

Abstract

Preeclampsia and conditions associated with impaired placental perfusion develop in almost 10% of all pregnancies. Patho- logic angiogenesis is one of the processes observed in preeclampsia. sFlt-1, PlGF and the sFlt-1/PlGF ratio are new and promising angiogenesis-related biomarkers. Our paper describes the present status of, and clinical practice opportunities for, these factors. 

According to present data, sFlt-1, PlGF and the sFlt-1/PlGF ratio are very useful tools in assessing placental angiogenesis abnormalities associated with preeclampsia and can be use in clinical practice. 

Abstract

Preeclampsia and conditions associated with impaired placental perfusion develop in almost 10% of all pregnancies. Patho- logic angiogenesis is one of the processes observed in preeclampsia. sFlt-1, PlGF and the sFlt-1/PlGF ratio are new and promising angiogenesis-related biomarkers. Our paper describes the present status of, and clinical practice opportunities for, these factors. 

According to present data, sFlt-1, PlGF and the sFlt-1/PlGF ratio are very useful tools in assessing placental angiogenesis abnormalities associated with preeclampsia and can be use in clinical practice. 

Get Citation

Keywords

sFlt-1; PlGF; preeclampsia

About this article
Title

The role of disordered angiogenesis tissue markers (sflt-1, Plgf) in present day diagnosis of preeclampsia

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 3 (2019)

Pages

173-176

Published online

2019-03-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0030

Pubmed

30950008

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(3):173-176.

Keywords

sFlt-1
PlGF
preeclampsia

Authors

Sebastian Kwiatkowski
Ewa Kwiatkowska
Andrzej Torbe

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