open access

Vol 90, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-03-29
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Is copeptin a new potential biomarker of insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome?

Justyna Widecka, Katarzyna Ozegowska, Beata Banaszewska, Anna Kazienko, Krzysztof Safranow, Dorota Branecka-Wozniak, Leszek Pawelczyk, Rafal Kurzawa
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0021
·
Pubmed: 30949999
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(3):115-121.

open access

Vol 90, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-03-29

Abstract

Objectives: Copeptin has been reported to play an important role in metabolic response in women with PCOS. However, the optimal cut-off value for detecting subjects with insulin resistance (IR) remains undetermined. We investigated whether copeptin can serve as an indicator of IR and tried to determine the optimal cut-off value of plasma copeptin concentration in detecting subjects with PCOS and IR.  Material and methods: We carried out a case-control study on 158 women with PCOS and HOMA-IR < 2.5, 96 women with PCOS with HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5, and 70 healthy volunteers. Plasma copeptin, as well as hormonal, biochemical, metabolic, and IR parameters, were measured. To investigate whether copeptin allows IR to be predicted in PCOS, we used logistic regression models and ROC curve analysis.  Results: Median plasma copeptin concentration was the highest in the women with PCOS and HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5. Logistic regression analysis revealed that copeptin was the strongest predictor of HOMA ≥ 2.5 (OR: 53.34 CI 7.94–358.23, p < 0.01). Analysis of ROC curves indicated that the cut-off value above 4 pmol/L of plasma copeptin concentration had high (99%) specificity but very low (21%) sensitivity in diagnosing of IR (AUC 0.607 (95% CI 0.53–0.68.  Conclusions: Our findings suggest that copeptin is associated with IR in PCOS patients, but due to low sensitivity should not be considered as a marker of IR. 

Abstract

Objectives: Copeptin has been reported to play an important role in metabolic response in women with PCOS. However, the optimal cut-off value for detecting subjects with insulin resistance (IR) remains undetermined. We investigated whether copeptin can serve as an indicator of IR and tried to determine the optimal cut-off value of plasma copeptin concentration in detecting subjects with PCOS and IR.  Material and methods: We carried out a case-control study on 158 women with PCOS and HOMA-IR < 2.5, 96 women with PCOS with HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5, and 70 healthy volunteers. Plasma copeptin, as well as hormonal, biochemical, metabolic, and IR parameters, were measured. To investigate whether copeptin allows IR to be predicted in PCOS, we used logistic regression models and ROC curve analysis.  Results: Median plasma copeptin concentration was the highest in the women with PCOS and HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5. Logistic regression analysis revealed that copeptin was the strongest predictor of HOMA ≥ 2.5 (OR: 53.34 CI 7.94–358.23, p < 0.01). Analysis of ROC curves indicated that the cut-off value above 4 pmol/L of plasma copeptin concentration had high (99%) specificity but very low (21%) sensitivity in diagnosing of IR (AUC 0.607 (95% CI 0.53–0.68.  Conclusions: Our findings suggest that copeptin is associated with IR in PCOS patients, but due to low sensitivity should not be considered as a marker of IR. 

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Keywords

copeptin; PCOS; insulin resistance; metabolic syndrome; AVP

About this article
Title

Is copeptin a new potential biomarker of insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 3 (2019)

Pages

115-121

Published online

2019-03-29

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0021

Pubmed

30949999

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(3):115-121.

Keywords

copeptin
PCOS
insulin resistance
metabolic syndrome
AVP

Authors

Justyna Widecka
Katarzyna Ozegowska
Beata Banaszewska
Anna Kazienko
Krzysztof Safranow
Dorota Branecka-Wozniak
Leszek Pawelczyk
Rafal Kurzawa

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