open access

Vol 90, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-02-28
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Influence of human Papilloma Virus (hPV) infection on early pregnancy

Lukasz Bober, Grzegorz Guzowski, Hanna Moczulska, Piotr Sieroszewski
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0012
·
Pubmed: 30860272
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(2):72-75.

open access

Vol 90, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-02-28

Abstract

Objectives: HPV infection in early pregnancy may be a cause of miscarriage. Pregnancy significantly increases the risk of HPV infection. While ascending intrauterine infection with colonization of the trophoblast is commonly observed, descend- ing hematogenous infection should also be considered. 

The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and its influence on pregnancy. 

Material and methods: The study was conducted in the years 2010–2015 on a group of 143 pregnant women. The study group consisted of 84 women with abnormal course of the first trimester of pregnancy. The control group consisted of 59 women with normal pregnancy who delivered healthy neonates. Samples of cervix tissue along with samples of tropho- blast or placenta were taken for the study. The presence and genotype of the HPV virus were detected using a BIOTOOL B&M Labs set. Statistical analysis was conducted using R software. 

Results: The rate of HPV infection in the entire studied population was 13% (19/143): the virus was confirmed in 18% (15/84) of patients in the study group and in 7% (4/59) of the control group. HR HPV was detected in 13 patients in the study group and three patients in the control group. HR HPV infection was more frequent in patients with an abnormal course of the first trimester of pregnancy (p = 0.03). HR HPV trophoblast infection was found only in patients in the study group (p = 0.02). In two members of the study group, the HPV virus was found in the trophoblast only. 

Conclusions: 

  1. The obtained results may confirm the presence of adverse effects of HPV infection on early pregnancy. 
  2. HR HPV trophoblast infection was observed only in women with 1st trimester complications. 
  3. The presence of HPV only in trophoblast samples in some patients may suggest a descending — hematogenous route of primary infection.

Abstract

Objectives: HPV infection in early pregnancy may be a cause of miscarriage. Pregnancy significantly increases the risk of HPV infection. While ascending intrauterine infection with colonization of the trophoblast is commonly observed, descend- ing hematogenous infection should also be considered. 

The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and its influence on pregnancy. 

Material and methods: The study was conducted in the years 2010–2015 on a group of 143 pregnant women. The study group consisted of 84 women with abnormal course of the first trimester of pregnancy. The control group consisted of 59 women with normal pregnancy who delivered healthy neonates. Samples of cervix tissue along with samples of tropho- blast or placenta were taken for the study. The presence and genotype of the HPV virus were detected using a BIOTOOL B&M Labs set. Statistical analysis was conducted using R software. 

Results: The rate of HPV infection in the entire studied population was 13% (19/143): the virus was confirmed in 18% (15/84) of patients in the study group and in 7% (4/59) of the control group. HR HPV was detected in 13 patients in the study group and three patients in the control group. HR HPV infection was more frequent in patients with an abnormal course of the first trimester of pregnancy (p = 0.03). HR HPV trophoblast infection was found only in patients in the study group (p = 0.02). In two members of the study group, the HPV virus was found in the trophoblast only. 

Conclusions: 

  1. The obtained results may confirm the presence of adverse effects of HPV infection on early pregnancy. 
  2. HR HPV trophoblast infection was observed only in women with 1st trimester complications. 
  3. The presence of HPV only in trophoblast samples in some patients may suggest a descending — hematogenous route of primary infection.
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Keywords

HPV; infection; early pregnancy; miscarriage

About this article
Title

Influence of human Papilloma Virus (hPV) infection on early pregnancy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 2 (2019)

Pages

72-75

Published online

2019-02-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0012

Pubmed

30860272

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(2):72-75.

Keywords

HPV
infection
early pregnancy
miscarriage

Authors

Lukasz Bober
Grzegorz Guzowski
Hanna Moczulska
Piotr Sieroszewski

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