open access

Vol 90, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-02-28
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Hormonal contraception in patients with epilepsy

Magdalena Bosak, Katarzyna Cyranka, Agnieszka Slowik
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0010
·
Pubmed: 30860270
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(2):61-65.

open access

Vol 90, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2019-02-28

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate hormonal contraception use in women with epilepsy and to assess the risk of potential interactions between contraceptives and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). 

Material and methods: Data on hormonal contraception were obtained prospectively in women of childbearing age treated in the university epilepsy clinic. 

Results: We evaluated 334 women with epilepsy (mean age 30.2 years). The majority of patients took one AED (193, 58%); the most commonly prescribed AEDs were: valproate, levetiracetam or lamotrigine. Hormonal contraception was used by 19 (5.7%) of all women of childbearing age. Only 7 patients (37%) of all those using hormonal contraception used prepa- rations that did not interact with AEDs; what is more 145 (46%) patients who did not use hormonal contraception were prescribed AEDs with high teratogenic potential (valproate or/and topiramate). 

Conclusions: A very small percentage of women with epilepsy of childbearing potential used hormonal contraception. More than a half of that group simultaneously took AEDs that may interact with oral contraceptives. A large proportion of women taking AEDs with high teratogenic potential were not using hormonal contraception. As interaction between OC and AEDs are common, nonhormonal, highly effective methods, such as IUDs, may be ideal for women with epilepsy. The results of the study indicate the need for closer cooperation between neurologist and gynecologist caring for women with epilepsy.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate hormonal contraception use in women with epilepsy and to assess the risk of potential interactions between contraceptives and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). 

Material and methods: Data on hormonal contraception were obtained prospectively in women of childbearing age treated in the university epilepsy clinic. 

Results: We evaluated 334 women with epilepsy (mean age 30.2 years). The majority of patients took one AED (193, 58%); the most commonly prescribed AEDs were: valproate, levetiracetam or lamotrigine. Hormonal contraception was used by 19 (5.7%) of all women of childbearing age. Only 7 patients (37%) of all those using hormonal contraception used prepa- rations that did not interact with AEDs; what is more 145 (46%) patients who did not use hormonal contraception were prescribed AEDs with high teratogenic potential (valproate or/and topiramate). 

Conclusions: A very small percentage of women with epilepsy of childbearing potential used hormonal contraception. More than a half of that group simultaneously took AEDs that may interact with oral contraceptives. A large proportion of women taking AEDs with high teratogenic potential were not using hormonal contraception. As interaction between OC and AEDs are common, nonhormonal, highly effective methods, such as IUDs, may be ideal for women with epilepsy. The results of the study indicate the need for closer cooperation between neurologist and gynecologist caring for women with epilepsy.

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Keywords

hormonal contraception; epilepsy; antiepileptic drugs; interaction

About this article
Title

Hormonal contraception in patients with epilepsy

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 2 (2019)

Pages

61-65

Published online

2019-02-28

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0010

Pubmed

30860270

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(2):61-65.

Keywords

hormonal contraception
epilepsy
antiepileptic drugs
interaction

Authors

Magdalena Bosak
Katarzyna Cyranka
Agnieszka Slowik

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