open access

Vol 90, No 1 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-01-31
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Is there a future for cell-free fetal dna tests in screening for preeclampsia?

Urszula Sarzynska-Nowacka, Przemyslaw Kosinski, Miroslaw Wielgos
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2019.0009
·
Pubmed: 30756372
·
Ginekol Pol 2019;90(1):55-60.

open access

Vol 90, No 1 (2019)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2019-01-31

Abstract

CffDNA screening is a powerful diagnostic tool in the prenatal diagnosis algorithm for chromosomal abnormalities. With detailed ultrasound examination as the mainstay of first-trimester risk assessment, cffDNA has been shown to be superior to first-trimester combined screening (FTCS) in false-positive rates for trisomy 21 detection. In light of the growing interest in cffDNA testing and the possibility of it replacing first-trimester biochemistry, we decided to investigate the usefulness of cffDNA tests in early-pregnancy risk assessment for preeclampsia (PE). The aim of this review paper was to evaluate clinical application of first-trimester cfDNA in predicting PE, as well as to investigate its possible use in first-trimester PE screening enhancement, also in cases where biochemistry is not performed.

Abstract

CffDNA screening is a powerful diagnostic tool in the prenatal diagnosis algorithm for chromosomal abnormalities. With detailed ultrasound examination as the mainstay of first-trimester risk assessment, cffDNA has been shown to be superior to first-trimester combined screening (FTCS) in false-positive rates for trisomy 21 detection. In light of the growing interest in cffDNA testing and the possibility of it replacing first-trimester biochemistry, we decided to investigate the usefulness of cffDNA tests in early-pregnancy risk assessment for preeclampsia (PE). The aim of this review paper was to evaluate clinical application of first-trimester cfDNA in predicting PE, as well as to investigate its possible use in first-trimester PE screening enhancement, also in cases where biochemistry is not performed.

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Keywords

cell-free fetal DNA; cffDNA; cell-free DNA; cfDNA; preeclampsia; PE; first-trimester screening; first-trimester combined screening

About this article
Title

Is there a future for cell-free fetal dna tests in screening for preeclampsia?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 90, No 1 (2019)

Pages

55-60

Published online

2019-01-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.2019.0009

Pubmed

30756372

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2019;90(1):55-60.

Keywords

cell-free fetal DNA
cffDNA
cell-free DNA
cfDNA
preeclampsia
PE
first-trimester screening
first-trimester combined screening

Authors

Urszula Sarzynska-Nowacka
Przemyslaw Kosinski
Miroslaw Wielgos

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