open access

Vol 91, No 11 (2020)
Review paper
Published online: 2020-11-30
Get Citation

Perinatal factors affecting the gut microbiota — are they preventable?

Maciej Zietek1, Malgorzata Szczuko2, Zbigniew Celewicz1, Agnieszka Kordek3
DOI: 10.5603/GP.2020.0114
·
Pubmed: 33301166
·
Ginekol Pol 2020;91(11):709-713.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Perinatology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
  2. Department of Human Nutrition and Metabolomics, Szczecin, Poland
  3. Department of Neonatology, Medical University in Szczecin, Poland, Poland

open access

Vol 91, No 11 (2020)
REVIEW PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2020-11-30

Abstract

Intestinal microbiota affects many aspects of physiological processes. The type of microbiota in the early stages of life is
a critical element conditioning the development of the immune response and food tolerance. Disturbed colonization of
the digestive tract resulting from the amount or diversity of bacteria colonies stimulates an inflammatory response that
is associated in later life with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. One of the elements disturbing normal colonization
in the perinatal period is the operative way of delivery by caesarean section and the administration of antibiotics,
used as a prophylactic measure as well as for therapeutic reasons. Based on the current state of knowledge, there is a lot
of evidence demonstrating the long-term adverse effects of these modifying agents for gut microbiota, which should be
kept to a minimum as far as possible.

Abstract

Intestinal microbiota affects many aspects of physiological processes. The type of microbiota in the early stages of life is
a critical element conditioning the development of the immune response and food tolerance. Disturbed colonization of
the digestive tract resulting from the amount or diversity of bacteria colonies stimulates an inflammatory response that
is associated in later life with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. One of the elements disturbing normal colonization
in the perinatal period is the operative way of delivery by caesarean section and the administration of antibiotics,
used as a prophylactic measure as well as for therapeutic reasons. Based on the current state of knowledge, there is a lot
of evidence demonstrating the long-term adverse effects of these modifying agents for gut microbiota, which should be
kept to a minimum as far as possible.

Get Citation

Keywords

gut microbiota; neonate; antibiotics; cesarean section

About this article
Title

Perinatal factors affecting the gut microbiota — are they preventable?

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 91, No 11 (2020)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

709-713

Published online

2020-11-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.2020.0114

Pubmed

33301166

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2020;91(11):709-713.

Keywords

gut microbiota
neonate
antibiotics
cesarean section

Authors

Maciej Zietek
Malgorzata Szczuko
Zbigniew Celewicz
Agnieszka Kordek

References (34)
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