open access

Vol 89, No 10 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-10-31
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Expression profiling of genes modulated by rosmarinic acid (RA) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

Bogna Juskowiak1, Anna Bogacz1, Marlena Wolek1, Adam Kamiński2, Izabela Uzar3, Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz4, Bogusław Czerny13
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0092
·
Pubmed: 30393841
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(10):541-545.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Natural Fibres and Medicinal Plants, Kolejowa 2, 62-064 Poznan, Poland
  2. Clinic of Pediatric Orthopedics, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
  3. Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacoeconomics, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland
  4. Division of Perinatology and Women’s Diseases, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 10 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2018-10-31

Abstract

Objectives: Cancer is the second most common cause of death, with breast cancer (BC) as the most frequently diagnosed neoplasm among females. The origin of BC is multifactorial and depends on environmental and genetic factors. The disease presents a significant challenge due to its drug resistance and frequent metastasis. Thus, new effective therapies and metastasis prevention are much needed. Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural polyphenol which possesses the ability to inhibit BC cell proliferation and demonstrates cytotoxic properties against those cells. In our study, we examined the effect of RA on the expression of ZEB1, MDM2, ABCB1, PTEN and TWIST1 genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.
Material and methods: MCF-7 cell cultures were treated with 0.2 μM doxorubicin (DOX) and 1.5, 15 or 50 μM of RA. Real-time PCR reaction was performed to analyze gene expression levels.
Results: PCR analysis showed a significant increase of the ZEB1 gene expression, which was about 3-fold for DOX 0.2 μM, 9-fold for 0.2 μM DOX + 1.5 μM RA and 0.2 μM DOX + 15 μM RA (p < 0.05), and about 6.5-fold for 0.2 μM DOX + 50 μM RA (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a decrease of the MDM2 gene expression was observed in all of the examined variants and was about 40–75% (p < 0.05). No influence of DOX and RA combined with DOX on the ABCB1, TWIST1 and PTEN genes was found.
Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that RA might be used as an adjuvant therapeutic factor in BC treatment.

Abstract

Objectives: Cancer is the second most common cause of death, with breast cancer (BC) as the most frequently diagnosed neoplasm among females. The origin of BC is multifactorial and depends on environmental and genetic factors. The disease presents a significant challenge due to its drug resistance and frequent metastasis. Thus, new effective therapies and metastasis prevention are much needed. Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural polyphenol which possesses the ability to inhibit BC cell proliferation and demonstrates cytotoxic properties against those cells. In our study, we examined the effect of RA on the expression of ZEB1, MDM2, ABCB1, PTEN and TWIST1 genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.
Material and methods: MCF-7 cell cultures were treated with 0.2 μM doxorubicin (DOX) and 1.5, 15 or 50 μM of RA. Real-time PCR reaction was performed to analyze gene expression levels.
Results: PCR analysis showed a significant increase of the ZEB1 gene expression, which was about 3-fold for DOX 0.2 μM, 9-fold for 0.2 μM DOX + 1.5 μM RA and 0.2 μM DOX + 15 μM RA (p < 0.05), and about 6.5-fold for 0.2 μM DOX + 50 μM RA (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a decrease of the MDM2 gene expression was observed in all of the examined variants and was about 40–75% (p < 0.05). No influence of DOX and RA combined with DOX on the ABCB1, TWIST1 and PTEN genes was found.
Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that RA might be used as an adjuvant therapeutic factor in BC treatment.

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Keywords

breast cancer; rosmarinic acid; molecular study; expression; adjuvant therapy

About this article
Title

Expression profiling of genes modulated by rosmarinic acid (RA) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 10 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

541-545

Published online

2018-10-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0092

Pubmed

30393841

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(10):541-545.

Keywords

breast cancer
rosmarinic acid
molecular study
expression
adjuvant therapy

Authors

Bogna Juskowiak
Anna Bogacz
Marlena Wolek
Adam Kamiński
Izabela Uzar
Agnieszka Seremak-Mrozikiewicz
Bogusław Czerny

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