open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-03-30
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Maternal placi protein levels in early- and late-onset preeclampsia

Mujde Can Ibanoglu1, A. Seval Ozgu-Erdinc2, Dilek Uygur2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0025
·
Pubmed: 29664550
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(3):147-152.
Affiliations
  1. Dr Nafiz Körez Sincan State Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
  2. Dr Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Care, Education And Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey

open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-03-30

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the maternal PLAC1 protein levels in early and late onset preec­lampsia.

Material and methods: A total of 135 pregnant women were included in the study, of which 55 were at < 34 weeks of gesta­tion and 80 were at ≥ 34 weeks of gestation, between June and November 2014 were recruited in this case control study.

Results: Analysis of maternal serum PLAC1 levels did not reveal any significant differences between early onset PE and controls (p = 0.422). However, late onset PE patients exhibited significantly elevated levels of PLAC1, in comparison with healthy controls (p = 0.026). The difference in PLAC1 levels between early onset PE and late onset PE was also significant (p = 0.001). Area under ROC curve of PLAC1 for early and late onset PE was 0.563 and 0.646 with p values of 0.422 and 0.026 respectively. Area under ROC curve of PLAC1 in PE was 0.613 with p value = 0.024. The cutoff value for PLAC1 was 6.19 ng/mL with sensitivity: 56% (95% CI 44.1–67.3) and specificity: 63 %; (95% CI 49.9–75.1) and diagnostic odds ratio: 2.2 (95% CI 1.1–4.4) (p value = 0.037). The cutoff value for PLAC1 was 7.2 ng/mL with sensitivity: 43% (95% CI 31.5–54.6) and specificity: 78% (95% CI 65.5–87.5) and diagnostic odds ratio: 2.69 (95% CI 1.25–5.79) (p value = 0.016)

Conclusion: In conclusion, the results of the current study showed that PLAC1 protein levels were significantly elevated in pregnant women with late onset PE in comparison with healthy control group.

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the maternal PLAC1 protein levels in early and late onset preec­lampsia.

Material and methods: A total of 135 pregnant women were included in the study, of which 55 were at < 34 weeks of gesta­tion and 80 were at ≥ 34 weeks of gestation, between June and November 2014 were recruited in this case control study.

Results: Analysis of maternal serum PLAC1 levels did not reveal any significant differences between early onset PE and controls (p = 0.422). However, late onset PE patients exhibited significantly elevated levels of PLAC1, in comparison with healthy controls (p = 0.026). The difference in PLAC1 levels between early onset PE and late onset PE was also significant (p = 0.001). Area under ROC curve of PLAC1 for early and late onset PE was 0.563 and 0.646 with p values of 0.422 and 0.026 respectively. Area under ROC curve of PLAC1 in PE was 0.613 with p value = 0.024. The cutoff value for PLAC1 was 6.19 ng/mL with sensitivity: 56% (95% CI 44.1–67.3) and specificity: 63 %; (95% CI 49.9–75.1) and diagnostic odds ratio: 2.2 (95% CI 1.1–4.4) (p value = 0.037). The cutoff value for PLAC1 was 7.2 ng/mL with sensitivity: 43% (95% CI 31.5–54.6) and specificity: 78% (95% CI 65.5–87.5) and diagnostic odds ratio: 2.69 (95% CI 1.25–5.79) (p value = 0.016)

Conclusion: In conclusion, the results of the current study showed that PLAC1 protein levels were significantly elevated in pregnant women with late onset PE in comparison with healthy control group.

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Keywords

pregnancy, maternal serum, PLAC1 protein, Preeclampsia

About this article
Title

Maternal placi protein levels in early- and late-onset preeclampsia

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 3 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

147-152

Published online

2018-03-30

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0025

Pubmed

29664550

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(3):147-152.

Keywords

pregnancy
maternal serum
PLAC1 protein
Preeclampsia

Authors

Mujde Can Ibanoglu
A. Seval Ozgu-Erdinc
Dilek Uygur

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