open access

Vol 89, No 1 (2018)
Research paper
Published online: 2018-01-31
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Impact of experimental diabetes and chronic hypoxia on rat fetal body weight

Katarzyna Karwasik-Kajszczarek1, Iwona Chmiel-Perzyńska2, Jacek Marcin Robak1, Aleksandra Billewicz-Kraczkowska3, Agnieszka Pedrycz4, Agata Smoleń5, Janusz Jacek Kraczkowski1
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2018.0004
·
Pubmed: 29411342
·
Ginekol Pol 2018;89(1):20-24.
Affiliations
  1. Chair and Department of Obstetrics and Pathology of Pregnancy, Medical University of Lublin, Poland
  2. Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland, 8B Jaczewskiego Street, 20-090 Lublin, Poland
  3. Department of Pediatric Propedeutics, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland, 6 Gębali Street, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
  4. Department of Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland, 11 Radziwiłłowska Street, 20-080 Lublin, Poland
  5. Department of Epidemiology and Clinical Research Methodology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland, 1 Chodźki Street, 20-093 Lublin, Poland

open access

Vol 89, No 1 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Obstetrics
Published online: 2018-01-31

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study is to determine the impact of the experimental diabetes and the chronic hypoxia on pregnancy development and rat fetal body weight.

Material and methods: The experiment was performed on female Wistar rats. Animals were divided into the experimen­tal groups. I — Controls, II — Untreated diabetes, III — Insulin-treated diabetes, IV — No diabetes with chronic hypoxia, V — Untreated diabetes and chronic hypoxia, VI — Insulin- treated diabetes and chronic hypoxia. Diabetes was induced in groups II, III, V and VI with intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin (STZ) at a dose of 40 mg/kg. Chronic hypoxia was induced by placing dams (groups IV, V and VI) in conditions of 10.5% oxygen and 89.5%. Insulin was administered subcutaneously at the dose of 9 IU/kg. Starting from the 6th day after STZ injection and chronic hypoxia conditions animals were caged together for 12 hours for 3 consecutive days to ensure fertilization. On day 21 of gestation the animals were decapitated, the fetuses were removed and weighted.

Results: Mean fetal body weight in separate groups were: I — 5.38 g, II — 6.04g, III — 5.32g, IV— 5.56 g, V — 3.45 g, VI — 6.23 g.

Conclusions: Pre-existing type 1 diabetes does not affect fetal body weight compared to healthy newborn control rats. Pro­longed hypoxia does not impact on fetal body weight. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy complicated with untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus leads to significant reduction of fetal body weight. Insulin treatment reversed the detrimental effect of chronic hypoxia on fetal development.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study is to determine the impact of the experimental diabetes and the chronic hypoxia on pregnancy development and rat fetal body weight.

Material and methods: The experiment was performed on female Wistar rats. Animals were divided into the experimen­tal groups. I — Controls, II — Untreated diabetes, III — Insulin-treated diabetes, IV — No diabetes with chronic hypoxia, V — Untreated diabetes and chronic hypoxia, VI — Insulin- treated diabetes and chronic hypoxia. Diabetes was induced in groups II, III, V and VI with intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin (STZ) at a dose of 40 mg/kg. Chronic hypoxia was induced by placing dams (groups IV, V and VI) in conditions of 10.5% oxygen and 89.5%. Insulin was administered subcutaneously at the dose of 9 IU/kg. Starting from the 6th day after STZ injection and chronic hypoxia conditions animals were caged together for 12 hours for 3 consecutive days to ensure fertilization. On day 21 of gestation the animals were decapitated, the fetuses were removed and weighted.

Results: Mean fetal body weight in separate groups were: I — 5.38 g, II — 6.04g, III — 5.32g, IV— 5.56 g, V — 3.45 g, VI — 6.23 g.

Conclusions: Pre-existing type 1 diabetes does not affect fetal body weight compared to healthy newborn control rats. Pro­longed hypoxia does not impact on fetal body weight. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy complicated with untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus leads to significant reduction of fetal body weight. Insulin treatment reversed the detrimental effect of chronic hypoxia on fetal development.

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Keywords

diabetes, hypoxia, body weight, fetus

About this article
Title

Impact of experimental diabetes and chronic hypoxia on rat fetal body weight

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 89, No 1 (2018)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

20-24

Published online

2018-01-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2018.0004

Pubmed

29411342

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2018;89(1):20-24.

Keywords

diabetes
hypoxia
body weight
fetus

Authors

Katarzyna Karwasik-Kajszczarek
Iwona Chmiel-Perzyńska
Jacek Marcin Robak
Aleksandra Billewicz-Kraczkowska
Agnieszka Pedrycz
Agata Smoleń
Janusz Jacek Kraczkowski

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