open access

Vol 88, No 10 (2017)
Review paper
Published online: 2017-10-31
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Diagnostic hysteroscopy and the risk of malignant cells intraabdominal spread in women with endometrial cancer

Norbert Stachowicz1, Diana Mazurek2, Tomasz Łoziński3, Artur Czekierdowski2
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0101
·
Pubmed: 29192417
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(10):562-567.
Affiliations
  1. Chair and Department of Epidemiology and Clinical Research Methodology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland, ul. Chodźki 1, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
  2. I Chair and Department of Oncological Gynaecology and Gynecology, Medical University of Lublin, Poland, ul. Staszica 16, 20-081 Lublin, Poland
  3. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Pro-Familia Hospital, Rzeszow, Poland

open access

Vol 88, No 10 (2017)
REVIEW PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-10-31

Abstract

Although hysteroscopy is currently the undisputed gold standard for the examination of the uterine cavity in women with suspected endometrial cancer, it remains controversial as a procedure that can enhance metastasis spread. Endometrial cancer cells may shed during hysteroscopy and be passively transported with fluid flow into the peritoneal cavity. The paper presents the review of current knowledge regarding the risk of neoplasm metastases in women who had diagnostic hysteroscopy and the conditions that have to be met for the procedure to be safe. We searched PubMed, Ovid, Medline and Scopus databases for data published in the years 1985–2017. The following browsing criteria, the “MeSH headings”: hysteroscopy, endometrial cancer, intraperitoneal or metastatic spread were used to find relevant papers. Based on the current data analysis we conclude that (1.) diagnostic hysteroscopy performed in women with endometrial cancer, especially in its early stages, is a very useful, efficient and safe diagnostic method and (2.) the distension media used for endoscopic procedures in the uterine cavity must be strictly controlled for relatively low pressures to prevent the increase in risk of endometrial cancer intraperitoneal spread.

Abstract

Although hysteroscopy is currently the undisputed gold standard for the examination of the uterine cavity in women with suspected endometrial cancer, it remains controversial as a procedure that can enhance metastasis spread. Endometrial cancer cells may shed during hysteroscopy and be passively transported with fluid flow into the peritoneal cavity. The paper presents the review of current knowledge regarding the risk of neoplasm metastases in women who had diagnostic hysteroscopy and the conditions that have to be met for the procedure to be safe. We searched PubMed, Ovid, Medline and Scopus databases for data published in the years 1985–2017. The following browsing criteria, the “MeSH headings”: hysteroscopy, endometrial cancer, intraperitoneal or metastatic spread were used to find relevant papers. Based on the current data analysis we conclude that (1.) diagnostic hysteroscopy performed in women with endometrial cancer, especially in its early stages, is a very useful, efficient and safe diagnostic method and (2.) the distension media used for endoscopic procedures in the uterine cavity must be strictly controlled for relatively low pressures to prevent the increase in risk of endometrial cancer intraperitoneal spread.

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Keywords

hysteroscopy, endometrial cancer, intraabdominal cancer cells spread

About this article
Title

Diagnostic hysteroscopy and the risk of malignant cells intraabdominal spread in women with endometrial cancer

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 10 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

562-567

Published online

2017-10-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0101

Pubmed

29192417

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(10):562-567.

Keywords

hysteroscopy
endometrial cancer
intraabdominal cancer cells spread

Authors

Norbert Stachowicz
Diana Mazurek
Tomasz Łoziński
Artur Czekierdowski

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