open access

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)
Research paper
Published online: 2017-07-31
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Serum levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor in association with oxidative stress index in patients with different types of HPV

Cenk Nayki, Murat Gunay, Mehmet Kulhan, Umit Nayki, Murat Cankaya, Nur Gozde Kulhan
DOI: 10.5603/GP.a2017.0067
·
Pubmed: 28819939
·
Ginekol Pol 2017;88(7):355-359.

open access

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS Gynecology
Published online: 2017-07-31

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this paper is to determine the oxidative–antioxidative status and levels of soluble interleukin-2 recep­tor (sIL-2R) in serum of patients with different types of HPV infections and to compare it with patients who are negative for HPV.

Material and methods: A total of 80 women were divided into three groups as follows: Group 1 consisted of 25 women who were positive for HPV types 16 or 18; Group 2 consisted of 25 women who were positive for other types of HPV includ­ing type 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 or 68; Group 3 consisted of 30 patients who were negative for HPV as a control group. Serum sIL-2R and plasma oxidative stress index (OSI) were analyzed.

Results: Serum sIL-2R levels were significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 2 and 3. OSI was found significantly increased in groups 1 and 2 compared to group 3. Also, we found a weak positive correlation between IL-2R and OSI.

Conclusion: sIL-2R and oxidative stress may have a role in HPV infection, especially in case of high-risk types.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this paper is to determine the oxidative–antioxidative status and levels of soluble interleukin-2 recep­tor (sIL-2R) in serum of patients with different types of HPV infections and to compare it with patients who are negative for HPV.

Material and methods: A total of 80 women were divided into three groups as follows: Group 1 consisted of 25 women who were positive for HPV types 16 or 18; Group 2 consisted of 25 women who were positive for other types of HPV includ­ing type 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 or 68; Group 3 consisted of 30 patients who were negative for HPV as a control group. Serum sIL-2R and plasma oxidative stress index (OSI) were analyzed.

Results: Serum sIL-2R levels were significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 2 and 3. OSI was found significantly increased in groups 1 and 2 compared to group 3. Also, we found a weak positive correlation between IL-2R and OSI.

Conclusion: sIL-2R and oxidative stress may have a role in HPV infection, especially in case of high-risk types.

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Keywords

human papillomavirus, total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, soluble interleukin-2 receptor

About this article
Title

Serum levels of soluble interleukin-2 receptor in association with oxidative stress index in patients with different types of HPV

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 88, No 7 (2017)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

355-359

Published online

2017-07-31

DOI

10.5603/GP.a2017.0067

Pubmed

28819939

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2017;88(7):355-359.

Keywords

human papillomavirus
total oxidant status
total antioxidant capacity
soluble interleukin-2 receptor

Authors

Cenk Nayki
Murat Gunay
Mehmet Kulhan
Umit Nayki
Murat Cankaya
Nur Gozde Kulhan

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