open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2008)
ARTICLES
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HPV infection in etiology of uterine cervix cancer

Anita Olejek
Ginekol Pol 2008;79(2).

open access

Vol 79, No 2 (2008)
ARTICLES

Abstract

Abstract Uterine cervical cancer may be the direct result of persistent HPV infection. The DNA analysis shows over 200 HPV types. The natural history of uterine cervix cancer is a constantly progressing process, from low pathology changes, through medium to major pathology changes, including microinvasion and invasive carcinoma. The population studies show that over 20% of women at the moment of examination is infected with HPV. The study of cervical cancer tissue revealed the HPV in the DNA, whereas the serological study revealed the presence of specific antibodies to HPV capsid antigens in most women (in USA the number amounts up to 70%). The serological conversion after HPV infection is not a common process. Therefore, the naturally infected women, still do not have enough antibodies and they are at the risk of infection, just as seronegative women. The vaccination of women between the ages of 15 and 25, causes the increase of the number of antibodies, several times higher than in the case of naturally acquired ones. The positive results of HPV examination is not a contraindication to vaccination. However, in case of vaccinated women, the negative test for 14 oncogenic HPV types has an overwhelmingly negative predictive value. Independent of the presence or absence of HPV infection, it is essential to continue cytological. The vaccination does not protect patients from all oncogenic HPV types. Cytological screening enables doctors to recognize cervical pathology at the early stage and introduce a proper treatment.

Abstract

Abstract Uterine cervical cancer may be the direct result of persistent HPV infection. The DNA analysis shows over 200 HPV types. The natural history of uterine cervix cancer is a constantly progressing process, from low pathology changes, through medium to major pathology changes, including microinvasion and invasive carcinoma. The population studies show that over 20% of women at the moment of examination is infected with HPV. The study of cervical cancer tissue revealed the HPV in the DNA, whereas the serological study revealed the presence of specific antibodies to HPV capsid antigens in most women (in USA the number amounts up to 70%). The serological conversion after HPV infection is not a common process. Therefore, the naturally infected women, still do not have enough antibodies and they are at the risk of infection, just as seronegative women. The vaccination of women between the ages of 15 and 25, causes the increase of the number of antibodies, several times higher than in the case of naturally acquired ones. The positive results of HPV examination is not a contraindication to vaccination. However, in case of vaccinated women, the negative test for 14 oncogenic HPV types has an overwhelmingly negative predictive value. Independent of the presence or absence of HPV infection, it is essential to continue cytological. The vaccination does not protect patients from all oncogenic HPV types. Cytological screening enables doctors to recognize cervical pathology at the early stage and introduce a proper treatment.
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Keywords

Uterine cervical cancer, human papilloma virus

About this article
Title

HPV infection in etiology of uterine cervix cancer

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 79, No 2 (2008)

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2008;79(2).

Keywords

Uterine cervical cancer
human papilloma virus

Authors

Anita Olejek

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