open access

Vol 83, No 4 (2012)
ARTICLES
Get Citation

Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of preterm birth: a systematic overview of cohort studies with meta-analysis

Wiesław Maciej Kanadys, Bożena Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Marian Jędrych, Jan Oleszczuk
Ginekol Pol 2012;83(4).

open access

Vol 83, No 4 (2012)
ARTICLES

Abstract

Objective: Despite numerous studies assessing the risk of preterm birth in obese women compared with normal weight patients, the scope of the association remains unclear. Therefore, we conducted a systematic overview and meta-analysis to summarize the available evidence from cohort studies on the relationship between maternal obesity and the risk of preterm birth. Methods: We searched bibliographic database: MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE for all relevant articles, with no language restrictions, which were published from January 1990 to September 2010, using a combination of the following search terms: maternal obesity or high body mass index (BMI) and preterm birth or pregnancy outcome. Crude odds ratios (OR) for individual outcomes were calculated for each study and were pooled by using the random-effects model. Results: Twenty seven studies proved eligible under the selection criteria. The crude OR of preterm birth were 1.18 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07 to 1.30], 1.28 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.75) and 1.11 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.25) among obese, severely obese and morbidly obese women, respectively, compared with normal weight women. We found an elevated risk of induced preterm birth among obese (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.04), severely obese (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.18) and morbidly obese pregnants (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.07) but a reduction in the risk of spontaneous preterm birth: OR = 0.98 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.20), OR=0.85 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.31) and OR=0.77 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.99), respectively. Obese women, independently of category the of obesity, also are at a higher risk of very preterm delivery (~ <32 weeks). Conclusions: Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of medically indicated preterm birth and with a decrease in the risk of spontaneous preterm birth. It appears that slightly increased risk of preterm birth overall may be masked by the increase in the incidence of induced preterm birth.

Abstract

Objective: Despite numerous studies assessing the risk of preterm birth in obese women compared with normal weight patients, the scope of the association remains unclear. Therefore, we conducted a systematic overview and meta-analysis to summarize the available evidence from cohort studies on the relationship between maternal obesity and the risk of preterm birth. Methods: We searched bibliographic database: MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE for all relevant articles, with no language restrictions, which were published from January 1990 to September 2010, using a combination of the following search terms: maternal obesity or high body mass index (BMI) and preterm birth or pregnancy outcome. Crude odds ratios (OR) for individual outcomes were calculated for each study and were pooled by using the random-effects model. Results: Twenty seven studies proved eligible under the selection criteria. The crude OR of preterm birth were 1.18 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07 to 1.30], 1.28 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.75) and 1.11 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.25) among obese, severely obese and morbidly obese women, respectively, compared with normal weight women. We found an elevated risk of induced preterm birth among obese (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.04), severely obese (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.18) and morbidly obese pregnants (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.33 to 2.07) but a reduction in the risk of spontaneous preterm birth: OR = 0.98 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.20), OR=0.85 (95% CI 0.55 to 1.31) and OR=0.77 (95% CI 0.60 to 0.99), respectively. Obese women, independently of category the of obesity, also are at a higher risk of very preterm delivery (~ <32 weeks). Conclusions: Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of medically indicated preterm birth and with a decrease in the risk of spontaneous preterm birth. It appears that slightly increased risk of preterm birth overall may be masked by the increase in the incidence of induced preterm birth.
Get Citation

Keywords

obesity, Body Mass Index, premature birth

About this article
Title

Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and the risk of preterm birth: a systematic overview of cohort studies with meta-analysis

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 83, No 4 (2012)

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2012;83(4).

Keywords

obesity
Body Mass Index
premature birth

Authors

Wiesław Maciej Kanadys
Bożena Leszczyńska-Gorzelak
Marian Jędrych
Jan Oleszczuk

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl