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Vol 84, No 7 (2013)
ARTICLES
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Placental growth hormone (PGH), pituitary growth hormone (GH1), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and ghrelin in pregnant women’s blood serum

Andrzej Kędzia, Agata Tarka, Elżbieta Petriczenko, Dominik Pruski, Kinga Iwaniec
DOI: 10.17772/gp/1614
·
Ginekol Pol 2013;84(7).

open access

Vol 84, No 7 (2013)
ARTICLES

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this work is to evaluate levels of placental growth hormone (PGH), pituitary growth hormone (GH1), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and ghrelin in pregnant women’s blood serum before, during and after delivery. Furthermore, the aim is to search for links and interdependence of GH1, PGH and IGF-I concentrations. Material and methods: Seventy nine blood samples were taken one to two hours before, during and half an hour after expulsion of placenta. All proteins studied were determined by ELISA method, using ELISA Kit. Results: The highest PGH concentration and IGF-I concentration in pregnant women’s blood serum was observed before delivery, while GH1 concentration was lowest. During and after delivery PGH and IGF-I concentration decreased proportionately and pituitary growth hormone concentration increased accordingly. About half an hour after delivery of the placenta, GH1 concentration was highest. Conclusions: In pregnant women’s blood there is a metabolic interdependence between PGH and IGF-I. Their concentration increases proportionately during pregnancy, and decreases after delivery. It appears that labor and delivery releases GH1 blockade, which level rises three-fold during delivery. After parturition its role and concentration returns to levels before pregnancy.

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this work is to evaluate levels of placental growth hormone (PGH), pituitary growth hormone (GH1), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and ghrelin in pregnant women’s blood serum before, during and after delivery. Furthermore, the aim is to search for links and interdependence of GH1, PGH and IGF-I concentrations. Material and methods: Seventy nine blood samples were taken one to two hours before, during and half an hour after expulsion of placenta. All proteins studied were determined by ELISA method, using ELISA Kit. Results: The highest PGH concentration and IGF-I concentration in pregnant women’s blood serum was observed before delivery, while GH1 concentration was lowest. During and after delivery PGH and IGF-I concentration decreased proportionately and pituitary growth hormone concentration increased accordingly. About half an hour after delivery of the placenta, GH1 concentration was highest. Conclusions: In pregnant women’s blood there is a metabolic interdependence between PGH and IGF-I. Their concentration increases proportionately during pregnancy, and decreases after delivery. It appears that labor and delivery releases GH1 blockade, which level rises three-fold during delivery. After parturition its role and concentration returns to levels before pregnancy.
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Keywords

pregnant women, PGH, GH1, IGF-1, ghrelin, blood serum

About this article
Title

Placental growth hormone (PGH), pituitary growth hormone (GH1), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and ghrelin in pregnant women’s blood serum

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 84, No 7 (2013)

DOI

10.17772/gp/1614

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2013;84(7).

Keywords

pregnant women
PGH
GH1
IGF-1
ghrelin
blood serum

Authors

Andrzej Kędzia
Agata Tarka
Elżbieta Petriczenko
Dominik Pruski
Kinga Iwaniec

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